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Aargh! Stay clear of Lenspen's SensorKlear II!

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paulofessel View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote paulofessel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Aargh! Stay clear of Lenspen's SensorKlear II!
    Posted: 17 September 2012 at 21:46
I've got a SensorKlear Loupe Kit from a local shop here in Brazil, since I was sick and tired of using expensive sensor swabs to clean my sensors and not having always the best results. As I've read good things about SensorKlear, I've decided to give it a try and went for the full monty which was the kit I've referred to above. After all, if you're not wet cleaning and the graphite pen is non-abrasive there is no way for things going wrong, right?

WRONG! I've located the stubborn dust spots I was getting within my Maxxum 5D first. The loupe really helps to find them dust bunnies, but for my horror, when I've first touched them I've noticed that the area showed smear (although the dust bunnies were gone, bummer!). Went after another dust bunny, and I've got more smear. At this point I was convinced that something had gone horribly wrong and I called the shop immediately. The sensor had marks as if I've had touched it with my fingers!

Of course I've returned the thing to the shop as COD together with my camera for they solve the mess the sensor is right now. I think it's not that difficult, as it's not the first time this sensor gets messed and probably a wet cleaning will return it to its original condition.

Meanwhile, I'll probably leave the dust bunnies of my remaining A700 as they are. And will stay away from SensorKlear for good, despite its good reviews.
Fotki

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KM5D, R.I.P.
 



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Fuzzphoto View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Fuzzphoto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2012 at 22:52
Are you sure you got a genuine product? I have several Lens Pens but some of them are genuinely fake ;-)

Joris' Fuzzphoto gallery | A77II, A700+VG, NEX-5, other gear
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paulofessel View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote paulofessel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2012 at 23:39
I've got them here, and surely they are a reputable shop. Mine came with the holographic maple sticker, and the price is correct - that is, it seems not to be a cheap copy.
Fotki

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KM5D, R.I.P.
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Pirate View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Pirate Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 September 2012 at 00:01
You needed to wet clean the sticky spot as the Sensorpen is for dust and dry cleaning not moisture or sticky stubborn spots. You need a wet kit like those supplied from Digi-Pad. The Lenspen kit is perfectly fine when used correctly for the dry dusty ingress it was designed for (dust and fibres). I also own it as well as the Lenspen and the Digi-Pad wet kit and have no complaints with either. Best to use the wet method and finish off with the dry if removing stubborn ingress. Sometimes a simple blow can remove surface ingress, but where does it go? If it's a genuine product, then it's not the fault of the supplier or manufacturer.

Sounds like you've used the wrong type of tool for the job as you've eluded to in your opening post:

I think it's not that difficult, as it's not the first time this sensor gets messed and probably a wet cleaning will return it to its original condition.

Don't blame Lenspen or their equipment for using the wrong tool for the job.

Edited by Pirate - 18 September 2012 at 00:06
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paulofessel View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote paulofessel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 September 2012 at 01:51
Originally posted by Pirate Pirate wrote:


Sounds like you've used the wrong type of tool for the job as you've eluded to in your opening post:

I think it's not that difficult, as it's not the first time this sensor gets messed and probably a wet cleaning will return it to its original condition.


About "the sensor getting messed", sometime ago I took the stupid decision of cleaning it with ethanol 92 for house cleaning. And despite the resulting mess, the sensor could be restored to its original condition. And also I'm not that nervous this time because the 5D is now my backup body along with the M7.

As for the kind of tool: according to you, what's the need for a SensorKlear then? Fiber and dry dust particles which are not stuck to the sensor can be removed with a blower, or even by just using the camera. It has already happened to me sometimes.

On the other hand, from their web page:

Product Overview

Trusted by N.A.S.A for use on the International Space Station the new SensorKlear Loupe Kit contains everything you need to keep your own DSLR camera sensor free from dust and your images spotless:

1. SensorKlear Loupe to detect dust on the sensor surface.
2. LensPen Hurricane Blower to remove dry dust.
3. SensorKlear II pen to remove those dreaded particles of sticky dust.


So according to the web site advertising, the SensorKlear II could be used for the job of removing sticky dust, which was my case. It did remove it, but also smeared my sensor. If you were lucky with the tool, kudos for you; it was not my case and thus it is banned forever from my photo bag.

Edited by paulofessel - 18 September 2012 at 01:54
Fotki

α900+some FF glass
α700+some DC glass
KM5D, R.I.P.
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CuriousOne View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote CuriousOne Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 October 2012 at 16:50
I also have negative experience with genuine lenspen lens cleaner. Bought it on amazon. It smears the grease on the lens, instead of removing it. Then purchased purosol - removed the grease with ease :)
 



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paulofessel View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote paulofessel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 October 2012 at 00:09
At least the shop refunded me, no questions. However I'm still waiting for the return of my Maxxum 5D.
Fotki

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α700+some DC glass
KM5D, R.I.P.
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homeranger View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote homeranger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 October 2012 at 00:59
I recently purchased a LensPen product from Overstock.com. When I received it, it did not look like the real deal. I emailed LensPen with a link to the product that O.co is selling. I promptly received an email from Ryan Keating, Vice President Marketing, for the LensPen group with a cc going to Murray Keating, CEO at The LensPen Group. Here is what he had to say:

Hi Mr. Plitt,

The picture at the link you have provided is NOT of a genuine LensPen. See http://www.lenspen.com/media/LensPen_Imitation_Notice_9.pdf?xprOpenPopup=1 for details on how to distinguish real from fake LensPens.

You can purchase genuine LensPen products from www.lenspen.com, Walmart, Best Buy, Amazon and many other fine retailers.

Thank you for bringing this violation of our LensPen trademark to our attention and thanks for your diligence in support of genuine LensPen products.

Best Regards,

Ryan Keating
Vice President Marketing the LensPen Group


I would encourage you to submit an email to LensPen advising them of the problem you had.

Good luck.
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Malinki_Malinki View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Malinki_Malinki Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 September 2016 at 17:29
I have recently purchased a second-hand A900 and I think I am behind the curve with adding my comments here... Oh, well. To clean the sensor of my A900 (and A580), here is what I do, and it works a treat.

WARNING: I am not advising you to do the same,and some of you will throw up your hands in horror, I am just telling you what I do, and you can then judge for yourself whether to experiment or not.

As in all things relating to camera innards, BE GENTLE!!!

Also. use a GOOD LIGHT pointed over or into the camera innards such as a bright desk lamp. It really helps if you can SEE what you are doing!

1) Switch on the Clean mode to raise the shutter and mirror and expose the 'cleaned' (vibrated) sensor.
2) Remove the lens.
3) Use a dust blower to dislodge most dust from the sensor and surrounding area.
4) WARNING! If you are unsure, then skip this next step!
Place the large diameter nozzle of a vacuum cleaner over the lens seating, but ensure that you don't encroach on the innards of the body. This will ensure a strong suction to suck away those bits of pollen and other minuscule bits of dust. [If you suck out your mirror or shutter/curtain, because you used too strong or too close a suction, then don't blame me!]
5) Use a soft-haired brush with a short bristle length (0.5-1cm), but packed tight enough to allow a bit of 'dig' to get stubborn spots off. Use a brush that is cut at an angle to allow easy access to the sensor corners. (I got mine in the make-up section of a Poundland shop in the UK for, yes you guessed it, £1.) (Note: If the brush hairs are TOO SOFT and/or TOO LONG, then you won't get any 'dig' to get things off; the brushing will be useless. Equally, if the hairs/bristles are too hard then you will probably just scratch your sensor.
6) Spray just 1 squirt/depression of 'DR Magic anti-static Screen Cleaner' onto the brush and GENTLY clean all of the sensor, especially getting onto the edges. Note: don't use too much fluid, 1 squirt is usually enough. If you have made the sensor too wet, then cover your index finger with a good-quality micro-fibre cloth and take up any excess. My brush is dual-ended, so I use the smaller side as an 'always dry' brush to finally, and gently take away any fibres I can see remaining, if any.
7) Use a LensPen lens/filter or sensor cleaner brush on the now DRY Sensor. Activate the carbon first by turning the cap/cover on the cleaner head. Remove the cap and GENTLY use the pen(s) over the whole surface of the sensor to do the final clean-up. Using the pen after the sensor has first had a 'wash' helps to get a pristine finish.
8) Give 1 final blow using the blower over the sensor to ensure any carbon dust from the pen is removed.
9)Test by taking a bright slightly over-exposed and out-of-focus picture of a light wall to show up (use screen magnification) if any small blotches remain. If so, repeat the above, but concentrate on where the remaining offending dust blobs are. (Remember blobs at the top of picture are on the bottom of the sensor).

Just to re-iterate; this works for me and if you do the above you do this at your own risk!   

I will just conclude by saying that this works well for ME and I have had no issues in (carefully) doing this.
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pdeley View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote pdeley Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 September 2016 at 14:26
Some of the better raw converters can do such good job masking dust bunnies that my preference is not to try any direct-contact sensor cleaning tools at all.

A lot of my outdoor shooting is in dry (semi)desert conditions with huge amounts of airborne clay specks and other superfine dry particles. To make matters even worse, much of my macro shooting happens on elbows and knees at ground level or just above, often with direct surface contact between the lower parts of hands+camera+lens and the dry soil.

I started using DxO when it was in its version 7 and by version 9 the dust tool became really good at removing dust bunnies. I pretty much stopped worrying altogether about sensor cleaning (and pellicle cleaning for SLT models) with any more complicated means than the camera's built-in cleaning function and a dust blower.

Stubborn bunnies that won't come off that way get marked once in DxO, and then the ever-growing "bunny constellation" for each individual camera is easily copied and pasted onto subsequent raw files before their conversion to jpegs.

Edited by pdeley - 13 September 2016 at 14:30
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Malinki_Malinki View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Malinki_Malinki Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 September 2016 at 15:14
Hi pdeley,

I too use DxO Optics Pro (11) and it is my Go-To Definitive RAW App. I agree the dust removal tool is great, but sometimes if, for whatever reason, I find I have to remove too many dust bunnies, or some are too large for DxO Optics Pro to cope with, then I think "It's time to clean my sensor again!"

I must admit that my environments are typically much more benign than the sandy/desert conditions you describe. I guess if I was faced with such conditions I would probably re-think my strategy with regards to avoiding ingress of the contaminates you describe. ...I would probably do something wild like put the whole camera in a clear plastic bag with just the lens face outside of the 'clean zone'.

Anyway, what do I know?

Good Luck in taking great photos whilst overcoming the challenges you describe! :-)

Best Regards,

Malinki_Malinki.
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