FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

E-mount vs A-mount

Page  12>
Author
lacenius View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie

Joined: 02 August 2009
Status: Offline
Posts: 8
Post Options Post Options   Quote lacenius Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: E-mount vs A-mount
    Posted: 01 August 2010 at 21:07
One thing that bothers me is that Sony would replace the a-mount. I love buying glass, but are relactant to invest in a-mount. I am sure that a-mount will be used for amother 5 years, but a lens is bought to last you for 10 to 20 years. What is your opinion on this?
 



Back to Top
5thElefant View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 19 September 2008
Country: United Kingdom
Location: Wales
Status: Online
Posts: 2690
Post Options Post Options   Quote 5thElefant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 August 2010 at 21:12
If anything I own isn't obsolete in 5 years I'll be amazed (and disappointed).
Simon Nex7|A7|α900|DXO
Back to Top
ricardovaste View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 08 August 2007
Country: United Kingdom
Location: Shropshire
Status: Offline
Posts: 9441
Post Options Post Options   Quote ricardovaste Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 August 2010 at 21:12
Shoot for today & be happy.
Back to Top
lauge View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 22 May 2007
Country: United Kingdom
Location: Denmark
Status: Offline
Posts: 383
Post Options Post Options   Quote lauge Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 August 2010 at 21:33
According to the Maya calendar the world ends in 2 years so give in for your lens lust

Sony NEX-7 | Sony A55 | Dynax 5D | Dynax 7 | 7000AF | lots of Minolta and MF lenses
Back to Top
jdkeck View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 27 June 2008
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Posts: 928
Post Options Post Options   Quote jdkeck Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 August 2010 at 21:33
i agree, i buy glass as a long term investment, i dont think the a mount will go away, but i think they had to make new lenses for the nex system just due to the physical size limits they probably were trying to stay within. i dont think it is bad, and i think sony may be banking on some of the nex users buying a mount leses and some alpha shooters buying a nex and using thier old lenses.
a850,cz24-70, sony 50 f1.4, sony 30f2.8, sony 70-300g, minolta 28-135,
Back to Top
frankieg View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 07 June 2008
Country: United States
Location: Pittsburgh, Pa.
Status: Offline
Posts: 645
Post Options Post Options   Quote frankieg Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 August 2010 at 21:35
None of us buys glass as an investment. Investments grow in value. The best that glass does is decrease in value slowly. We buy it to take photos. It will still take photos for years after Sony abandons the a mount, if it does abandon it. And then if it does there will be lots of cheap glass out there that takes great pictures.

The chances are slim they will do that. The same as Nikon and Cannon they will continue the a mount line. It is successful. They make money on it. They are trying to change the game though and capture a segment of the market in a manner the Nikon and Cannon can't easily compete in. They are making a new and separate market not exiting one.

SLR style cameras with optical VF will still be desirable and will still be supported. As was said before... go take pictures. Chose the line you want and enjoy.

Edited by frankieg - 01 August 2010 at 21:37
 



Back to Top
Fuzzphoto View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 04 April 2006
Country: Netherlands
Status: Offline
Posts: 2434
Post Options Post Options   Quote Fuzzphoto Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 August 2010 at 21:47
Who says the A-mount will disappear? Phasing out the A-mount would be an incredibly stupid and expensive multi-million move by Sony. Besides, the E-mount is unsuited for SLR cameras.

Great, now this is thread is going to show up in Google searches and cause another world wide storm of distrust, like the "Sony is dropping FF" bull manure.
Joris' Fuzzphoto gallery | A700+VG, NEX-5 and other gear
Back to Top
brian33 View Drop Down
Alpha Eyes group
Alpha Eyes group

Joined: 21 October 2008
Location: France
Status: Offline
Posts: 5648
Post Options Post Options   Quote brian33 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 August 2010 at 21:53
Cameras are so good today that all manufacturers could simply stop improving them forever and ever and photography would not suffer in the slightest. Sure lenses outlast bodies but in 5 years I'm sure you'll be able to find an 850 or 900 somewhere in good shape and squeeze the life out of it and have many, many years of happy photography to come.

Who knows, will you even be shooting in 10 years?
Back to Top
htarash View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 25 July 2009
Country: Australia
Location: VIC, Australia
Status: Offline
Posts: 281
Post Options Post Options   Quote htarash Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 August 2010 at 22:09
After the release of all what is planned for this year, Sony will have another successful year of new equipment, and when you look at the last few years, this has been a continues improvement.

If you think like this for everything you buy, you will never need to buy a TV, Music player, Video player, or anything at all, as almost every couple of year there is a new technology.

A kit setup would take nice picture for the next 5 years (Take an extended warrantee) and after that the pictures of what you have taken is your value in money and counts as your investment.
R.I.P A77|Welcome A99| SAL70300GSSM|R.I.P SAL1650SSM|SAL50F18SAM|Σ 105F2.8M|HVL-F42AM|E-PM1+14-42
Flickr
Back to Top
addy landzaat View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 22 April 2006
Country: Netherlands
Location: Netherlands
Status: Online
Posts: 4772
Post Options Post Options   Quote addy landzaat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 August 2010 at 22:14
Gee, two completely different systems. And lenses you buy to be used, not as an investment. Somewhere I saw the prices of Maxxum lenses at introduction. Some lenses increased (100/2) but most are simply cheap these days (look up what the 35-70/4 cost back then...).

Anyway, people shouldn't worry this much. You can use your Alpha lenses on your Nex!
Das Bild ist ein Modell der Wirklichkeit - Wittgenstein
Back to Top
markce View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 27 May 2007
Country: Netherlands
Location: N.Br.
Status: Offline
Posts: 298
Post Options Post Options   Quote markce Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 August 2010 at 22:24
Have a look at Minolta Vectis V-lenses. It is very hard to introduce new lens mount that will last longer than one generation of camera's. Evil camera's are an opportunity, question is if the profile (spec set) is distinct enough to last. As soon as Sony compact SLR's get live-view and video...
Back to Top
PhotoTraveler View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 30 September 2005
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Posts: 6359
Post Options Post Options   Quote PhotoTraveler Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 August 2010 at 23:37
As mentioned, if you see lenses as an investment, you have already gone wrong.

DSLR camera systems are a truly rare situation when it comes to products, longevity and modularity. The fact we have systems with mounts 1/2 century old still in active devolvement that are more or less still compatible is a dumbfounding situation.   Instead of moaning if and when a mount does get changed or obsoleted, we should be happy they last as long as they do. As you won't find other products where you can buy a brand new item just designed, and connect it to a camera 25 years old and it works fully. (say putting any of the non SSM ZA lenses on a Maxxum 7000).

Buying a lens as investment is the same mistake as buying a house as an investment. We had the housing crisis because folks missed the reality that the value of a house should go down with time, just like nearly everything else. Unless you are putting improvements into it, it's just getting older and more dated and worn. The land it sits on can and should gain in value due to it being a fairly fixed quantity with increasing demand due to population growth. A lens can't be improved, it can only wear down. So it shouldn't go up in value, and shouldn't really hold value. It's design/performance can slow it's devaluing though. It was a rare situation with Minolta were we saw lens prices go up. But we all know the situations around why. And now the prices have settled down. I bought a 400G for 1500 and sold it for 3000, that is a truly freak thing to see happen.

Everyone should look at their camera/lens system and think of what if it was all destroyed tommorow, or the manufacture dumped it and no savior, or some other process that makes it worthless. If you can't accept it and move on, and not have an ill effect from this, then you have made a mistake. If the total loss of your gear causes a financial issue for you, you made a major mistake in buying it. Think of bodies. No one should be thinking of re-sale when you buy it. You buy it, that body is worth basicaly nothing soon as you start using it. So if you had to save for months to buy it, you've made a big mistake.

This issue only really impacts a small segment of the market in reality. The bulk of DSLRs are bought by amatures who buy entry level kits. And may never even buy a second lens, and then 18-24 months later, they might buy again, but no matter when they buy again. They will be looking at a kit from all the makes again. So mount investment means nothing. The old will just be given to someone, or go in the trash. This is probably 60-70% of the camera market.   You have the small part of the market which are Pro's many/maybe most, don't own their gear, their employer does. So death of a system, loss of gear means nothing, they move on. Those who do own it write it down so it's basically worthless after 3 years anyways. Plus they make a living from their gear so are always re-placing anyways.

The only segment the death of mounts impact is that small part of the market where the lens collector lives. Those happen to be most the folks in internet forums for cameras. These folks (raises hand) have more gear than they need, most gathers dust. Will own lenses that duplicate themselves, etc. Some they keep for emotional reasons and so forth. These are the ones that freak out.   For the most part these folks won't matter to the maker since they are a small part of the user base, and these folks mainly buy used. But they do spend a lot on new lenses, most the time stuff they shouldn't be buying. These can often be the folks we see talking about selling gear and doing this that and the other thing to get enough money for a peice of gear. They have bought themselves into a place they shouldn't be in. It's not really the camera makers worry about what that person has done.

Sony is happy that someone bought way more lens than they need. The classic amateur who does it as a hobby and yet owns all the F2.8 Zooms, and some Zeiss primes because they think they need them. But once you bought them, there is no money to be had from you. So burning that person by changing mounts isn't a huge concern to them. You could get mad, you decide you want nothing to do with E mount as a spite move and such, so you go to F or EOS.   You buy all over again, having not learned and again buy far more lens than you need or can afford to loose. And then Nikon and Canon go EVIL and ditch their old mounts, the cycle repeats.

We are in a transition. 10 years from now the DSLR mounts will be all but dead. Every brand will have a new mount. So no matter where you are, it's an issue. Just don't buy into a system more than you can afford to bail on.

Best thing to do is just own what you need, and don't spend more than what you are ok loosing. You won't be stressing, you will get better with that small set of gear than having a mountain of lenses you never master. Less is more.
Back to Top
photoBear View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 25 August 2009
Country: Australia
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Posts: 406
Post Options Post Options   Quote photoBear Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 August 2010 at 01:47
Seems thereís a bit of a dispute over the terms investment and obsolete.

All I know is that the a mount dslr products I buy now will serve me for the purposes in which they were designed long after there are new products on the market.

I may have to replace or add something now and then but thatís what you get when you buy into anything and when I have to make a jump to a dramatically different system I'll think about what I want and go for it.
Back to Top
PhotoTraveler View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 30 September 2005
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Posts: 6359
Post Options Post Options   Quote PhotoTraveler Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 August 2010 at 03:35
yes, the ideal situation is a camera company shows the entire system, and you can plot exactly what you need. Sadly reality for new systems doesn't work that way. When people change mounts, they can plan out systems. If someone is going from Sony to Nikon or Canon, they can plot out the most efficient lens lineup easily. Going to a new EVIL mount, not so easy. Many of us have a mix of lenses simple because we bought in, and progressively upgraded and each upgrade was based on working on other bits of the system we had, or dreaming towards what we thought would happen in the future. It's a tough nut.

Still, for a lot of us, owning gear that we can't go down to the store and buy a new replacement for is not what we want, thus I have no mainstay lenses that aren't in production. Many folks want all gear to be within warranty, or what ever the makers window is for spare part availability.

A big shift is with digital, the idea of buying a camera body and using it for a decade or more is gone. Even after 3 years it may still work fine (often touch and go if it still works well), but it's become a turd compared to what is out there new and for a cheap price at that. So bodies have no value or investment ability. Lenses are touch and go to, as what size sensor will be the norm is unknown, and there isn't just one size. Aspects like AF drive method, aperture control method are always under change. Only canon EOS and the new EVIL mounts have that stable. So lenses go obsolete . If Sony were to ditch the body AF motor, 16million lenses just became doorstops.
Back to Top
Dyxum main page >  Forum Home > Equipment forums > Lens Talk Page  12>

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.172 seconds.

Monitor calibration strip

Dyxum.com - Home of the alpha system photographer

Find us on Google+

Feel free to contact us if needed.

Links monetized by viglink VigLink