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Good Friday: the Way of the Cross

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pauljg View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote pauljg Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Good Friday: the Way of the Cross
    Posted: 05 April 2012 at 10:22
Good Friday (the Friday before Easter) is devoted to the memory of the Passion of Christ.
In most Roman Catholic and many other Christian Churches there is a series of pictures of the Way of the Cross showing in 14 views
the Passion of Christ and with each of the stations an appropriate prayer or meditation is spoken.
There are many different forms this Way of the Cross takes and in this thread several are shown.

First here are the Stations of the Way of the Cross in the parish church of St.John/St.Michael in Enschede:

1. Jesus is condemned to death



2. Jesus accepts the cross



3. Jesus falls the first time



4. Jesus meets His Mother



5. Simon of Cyrene carries the cross



6. Veronica wipes the face of Jesus



7. Jesus falls the second time



8. Jesus meets the women of Jerusalem



9. Jesus falls the third time



10. Jesus is stripped of His garments



11. Crucifixion: Jesus is nailed to the cross



12. Jesus dies on the cross



13. Jesus' body is removed from the cross



14. Jesus is laid in the tomb.




All pictures Dynax7d, Tamron 28-200mm at 50mm, f/5.6, between 1/2 and 1/8s, ISO200

Edited by pauljg - 05 April 2012 at 10:29
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pauljg View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote pauljg Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 10:28
The second example are the Stations of the Way of the Cross in the chapel of the Retirement Home "Arienshuis" in Enschede:

1. Jesus is condemned to death



2. Jesus accepts the cross



3. Jesus falls the first time



4. Jesus meets His Mother



5. Simon of Cyrene carries the cross



6. Veronica wipes the face of Jesus



7. Jesus falls the second time



8. Jesus meets the women of Jerusalem



9. Jesus falls the third time



10. Jesus is stripped of His garments



11. Crucifixion: Jesus is nailed to the cross



12. Jesus dies on the cross



13. Jesus' body is removed from the cross



14. Jesus is laid in the tomb.




All pictures Dynax7d, Sony 70-300mm at 140mm, f/8, between 1/3 and 1/20s, ISO200
pauljg - NL - see also my blog and

website (with slowly growing page in English)
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owenn01 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote owenn01 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 10:53
Hi Paul,

Whilst I have to admit to not being terribly 'Religious' in my own thinking, I do have a great affection and admiration for the ways that the Stations of the Cross have been interpreted and depicted over many decades by the Church and it's followers. I have posted one theme myself many years ago of an interpretation from Rocamadour of this and it always fascinates me to see both the literal and photographic interpretation that can arise from these depictions.

I think in the above two postings, you have given us nearly two sides to this occasion - the near 'classical' one above with fine wood carvings and strict representations of the human form, strongly contrasted to the first which is very much more modern with the human form being much more stylized and lacking in details - though not in interpretation which comes over very strongly.

I like these two sets both in themselves and as a contrast to each other; I also find your own presentation of these of a high order and reflects the care needed to fully present us with the details and messages that these convey.

A very fitting posting for today and thank you for taking to time to put these together for us.

Best regards and have a very Happy Easter! Neil.
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pauljg View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote pauljg Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 11:16
Hi Neil: thanks for your thoughtful comments and praise
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samyboy View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote samyboy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 12:15
Just plain beautiful, thanks for sharing.

SVM. Chicago.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote brettania Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 13:09
I am with Neil.

I'm not religious but know that religions heve been the source of great art.

I prefer the modern look as portrayed in the parish church of St.John/St.Michael in Enschede, although I acknowledge the great craftsmanship present in the carvings.
 



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pauljg View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote pauljg Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 13:41
The third, and also very modern (although already about 50 years old) example are the Stations of the Way of the Cross in the New Church of Vercorin (Switzerland)
This is a picture of that new church, built in 1964, standing just to the left of the old church:


Dynax7d, Tamron 28-200mm at 110mm, f/8, 1/125s, ISO200

This way of the cross consists of 7 windows of stained glass, each 1.6m long and 35 cm high. The total length is slichtly more than 12m.
It has been designed and made by the Swiss artist Albert Chavaz

1. Jesus is condemned to death



2. Jesus accepts the cross



3. Jesus falls the first time



4. Jesus meets His Mother



5. Simon of Cyrene carries the cross



6. Veronica wipes the face of Jesus



7. Jesus falls the second time



8. Jesus meets the women of Jerusalem



9. Jesus falls the third time



10. Jesus is stripped of His garments



11. Crucifixion: Jesus is nailed to the cross



12. Jesus dies on the cross



13. Jesus' body is removed from the cross



14. Jesus is resurrected after his death.



(Note: in this case the last station depicts not the laying in the tomb but the resurrection which is done more often in the countries of southern Europe)
All pictures Dynax7d, Tamron 28-200mm at 45mm, f/5.6, between 1/4 and 1/15s, ISO200
pauljg - NL - see also my blog and

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brettania View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote brettania Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 14:30
I'm staying with number one.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote alpha_in_exile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 14:56
Neil makes a good comment, that there have been many very different ways of presenting the Stations (poetry as well as visual I believe). In America (especially) there are some denominations which prohibit or discourage artistic representations of Christ/God/biblical themes, and I come from one of those denominations (Baptist). But as a person who appreciates art & disagrees with the theological arguments against it (I guess I'm a bad Baptist - : ), I've always enjoyed the Stations and the freedom of artistic expression that different versions exhibit. I've enjoyed these, Paul.

Incidentally, I have a sculptor friend who worked on some beautiful relief sculptures of the Stations, so I have a bit of an inside perspective. You can see them on this webpage, http://www.hempelstudios.com/portfolio.html (second to last row, click on the picture to see it in a larger size).

The Stations can be a great artistic exercise, like a One Prime Challenge or a Themed Views thread, because there are required elements, as you can see from the examples Paul has posted, so it's all about interpretation. And the meditation (the artist's when creating, & the parishoner's when viewing), is not unlike eastern forms of meditation (ref. Ignatian meditation for example).
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Post Options Post Options   Quote owenn01 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 16:15
Hi Paul.

I think this latest set is by far and away both the most colourful and stylized of the three you've posted so far. I also don't know if it is the intense colours or the angular shapes in these but they also appear much more dynamic as a set than the other two - is that fitting for the subject? I don't know, but they are most definitely eye catching!

By the way - If I had to choose between the 'Old' and the 'New' as far as the churches were concerned in this later set, the 'Old' would win my vote by a country mile I'm afraid!

Thanks for the set and best ergards, Neil.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Basil Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 18:17
Paul,

What a marvelous series at a most appropriate time of the year. Being a man of the cloth, I appreciate the beauty and splendor of all three sets. However, I find the last group to be the one that gets my attention the most. I bet they look spectacular in real life (although the pictures aren't bad either.)

Basil
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Jocelynne Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 19:15
Wonderful. Precious. Inspiring. Thanks to all who contributed.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote owenn01 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2012 at 20:25
Hi Paul,

Ive had a wee while to mull these shots over and I keep coming back to the second set as a very, very good example of 'Record' photogrpahy.

Why do I say that? Well, each subject is treated in the same way and each plaque is almost perfectly aligned with the next image; it is central in the frame and there is little to no 'reportage' or interpretation to each scene; the lighting is well controlled or as controlled as you can achieve given the distribution of these plaques around the church space, and finally should these be lost due to fire or other activity they could be readliy reconstructed with the right level of skill and understanding by a woodcarver. They are shots of a very high technical order and this is sometimes not as easy to achieve as it sounds...

All these fulfill perfectly the demands of good, solid Record photography and it is an excellent sereis for that - and probably why I like it so much!

Thanks for sharing these and the others with us - I just had to get that off my chest so to speak!!

Best regards, Neil.
My Mantra: "Comment on other's work as you would wish to have yours commented upon". Go on - it's fun!
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