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Help with (real) macro shots.

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bartman View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote bartman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 February 2012 at 09:59
Interesting job... These are my two cents:

-tripod
-MLU
- You don't need f11 when the camera is perpendicular above the paper: Open the diafragm to 5.6, increase ISO to 400 and increase shutterspeed.
- use more light: flash.
- increase the mass of your equipment to decrease shake.

Good luck.

Bart
 



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Menkert View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Menkert Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 February 2012 at 10:22
I used f11 to decrease the shutter time to get a shutter time of seconds (I also tried f5.6 with shorter shutter speeds).

The tripod is probably causing the problem. It is not the most sturdy one, and the Manfrotto 222 (please google) makes the camera off-center a lot. But it is the only setup i've got.

The same setup (but different images), was used with a A33. Those images where much better, probably because the much lighter moving parts. Just the curtains.

Thanx.
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dilettante View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote dilettante Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 February 2012 at 10:38
Originally posted by Menkert Menkert wrote:

the Manfrotto 222 (please google) makes the camera off-center a lot.


Unless you have it vertical, with the camera pointing horizontally to vertically mounted image.
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dilettante View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote dilettante Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 February 2012 at 10:40

One other thing: are you using auto or manual focus? If you're using autofocus, there could be a front/back focus issue, which could explain the difference between the A500 and A33 with the same setup.
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Bob J View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Bob J Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 February 2012 at 10:51
The quality of the tripod is rather key. You need to get the tripod at steady as possible. Use of flash would also help.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote tmihai Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 February 2012 at 10:55
Menkert

There is something I do not understand from your post:
You use a Minolta 50mm macro f2.8 and a kenko 1.4x converter to achieve 1:1 magnification
What I do not understand is why the Kenko converter, the Minolta 50mm macro can do 1:1 alone.
You are at 1.4 : 1 from what I see. And at this magnification and considering the fact that you are looking at some red dots (and red stats first to enter into diffraction) and the f11 aperture your image may be soft because of diffraction.
Plus the converter introduces some softness of is own.

For a true 1:1 try only your Minolta 50mm focused at 1:1 and an f no lower than 9.5.
( Magnification does not change with the size of the sensor a lens that does 1:1 on a full frame is also 1:1 on an APS-C)

If you want to use your converter than do not go lower than f6.7
 



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keith_h View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote keith_h Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 February 2012 at 12:04
Manual focus, use a proper sturdy tripod, pin the thing to be photographed to the wall and make sure theres plenty of ambient light. You should be able to go f8@128 if the light is adequate.

Use the 2 second delay. It sounds to me like a combination of feeble tripod and lack of light/long shutter speed.

This is hand held in good light, you should easily be able to get this type of sharpness or better with a tripod.



Camera Maker: SONY
Camera Model: DSLR-A200
Lens: 100mm F2.8 Macro
Image Date: 2010-09-26 16:19:07 +1000
Focal Length: 100.0mm (35mm equivalent: 150mm)
Aperture: f/8.0
Exposure Time: 0.0080 s (1/125)

ISO equiv: 100

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Menkert View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Menkert Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 February 2012 at 12:11
Thanx you all!

I think i know what to do right now. => sturdy setup + move the setup to a bright location + about F5.6 + shutter speed preferably 1/200.
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kurja View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote kurja Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 March 2012 at 12:40
Originally posted by Menkert Menkert wrote:

Thanx you all!

I think i know what to do right now. => sturdy setup + move the setup to a bright location + about F5.6 + shutter speed preferably 1/200.


Hi,

I would recommend also trying a flash. Shooting below sync speed in dim ambient light, aperture set to about F5-F8 (closed down for improved sharpness but below diffraction limit, and decreasing ambient light's contribution to exposure), using a low iso value - your flashgun(s) will solve any and all motion blur-related problems, as the effective exposure time will be faster than what your camera's shutter is capable of.

But I agree that if you can get the ambient bright enough to use shutter speeds of 1/200 or faster, that should help with your issue as well - if it is vibration-induced blur.
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