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How to improve with photoshop on this photo..

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Debra View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Debra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: How to improve with photoshop on this photo..
    Posted: 29 November 2012 at 12:49
Hello Everyone..


This was taken Sunday when I just could not get the lighting right, it seems that I only had one flash light working I was trying with two flash learning..

What would you do in photoshop to get make this shot more appealing not looking flat is my main gripe and where would I start i.e. do you up exposure first or contrast and work from there or is there another way..

The photograph underneath I changed to black and white, played around in RAW moved to the side and extended the white .. I blew the white so it was bright but for the face I had another layer and took back to the first black and white, as with blowing the it made his face far too bright.. I also straightened the 2nd one.. thanks in advance - debra

Anyhelp much appreciated.. could do with some decent books lol

no 1. coloured



no 2..



Edited by Debra - 29 November 2012 at 14:50
 



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Debra View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Debra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 November 2012 at 13:48
what i wrote i since change the last pic

Edited by Debra - 29 November 2012 at 14:22
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Cindy Flood View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Cindy Flood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 November 2012 at 14:36
To improve the colored photo, I would click on the adjustment layer icon and choose levels. You will be able to see that you are under-exposed. Drag the point in until it touches the important data of the histogram. The black point can be moved to the right slightly, too. Now change the blending mode of the layer to luminosity, so that only the luminosity is affected and not the color.
That will give you a better start. I think that a slight lowering of saturation on another adjustment layer (keep it at normal blending mode), may improve, but you will have to play around.
Some further color tweaking might be needed, but it is hard to tell at this point. You need to get the exposure right first.
-Cindy Flood
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Debra View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Debra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 November 2012 at 14:43
I played around before I saw your reply cindy.. yes, def agree get exposure right first, finding it very hard esp when using flash, but will get there in the end..

My main problem is his skin, he is not white, but looks tanned and I dont want to loose his colour but at the same time I do not want him to look yellowish..

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Cindy Flood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 November 2012 at 14:53
OK, Now that exposure is right, you can correct his skin color.
Flatten layers. Duplicate the layer. Take the eyedropper and click (with the shift held down) on a spot below his lip that is not in shadow and not too bright, either. Make sure that your info panel is showing. It will show RGB values. Right click on the eyedropper icon next to the RGB dislplay in your info panel and choose CMYK color. Now your values are displayed in CMYK values. Bring up a curves adjustment. Adjusting the red layer will adjust the cyan. Green layer >magenta. Blue layer >yellow. Adjust the layers so that cyan value is 1/3 to 1/5 of yellow value and magenta is just a couple of percentage points less than yellow. This will give you a nice skin tone.
-Cindy Flood
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Cindy Flood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 November 2012 at 15:01
I think you will still have to lower saturation a little after you get the skin balanced.
-Cindy Flood
 



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Debra View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Debra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 November 2012 at 15:07
Thanks for replying cinch, will go and prob post in the morning, it's bed time here lol..

Debra
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Post Options Post Options   Quote brettania Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 November 2012 at 19:56
Just "threw" this through PaintShopPro auto-adjust and DeNoise. No dramatic changes.



And PSP's take on a b&w.



Edited by brettania - 29 November 2012 at 20:05
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Post Options Post Options   Quote brettania Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 November 2012 at 21:56
Not sure about the skin colour -- is it correct?
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Mark L Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 November 2012 at 00:22
I see nothing much wrong with your No 2 (black and white) image. Exposure, tones and contrast all look good. In fact I like it a lot.

The colour image does seem a little underexposed and lacking in contrast and saturation, but this is nothing that a few tweaks in Photoshop, or better still ACR, can fix. Only you can know exactly what his skin colour should look like, but here's my quick attempt in Photoshop. With your knowledge of what he really looks like, I'm sure you can do better.



Levels adjustment Black point 23; Gamma 1.20; White point: 209
Hue/Saturation: Saturation +25
Colour balance (midtones) Cyan/Red +17 Yellow/Blue +17

As far as lighting is concerned, there is not a lot you can alter in post processing. This you really have to get right when taking the shot. To get a a less flat lighting effect, try using just one flash, off camera to one side. If necessary use a reflector on the other side of the subject to partially fill some of the shadows.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Debra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 November 2012 at 00:35
Thanks you for more replies..

Brettania almost correct give or take.. For the coloured photo is pretty good but for b and white he looks too dark lol...

I think for me getting skin tone right it too hard but then at again photography seems to hard, I seem one step forward two steps back lol...

..

Mark..

I will put yr settings thru photoshop so then I can watch the changed and see what I am doing and keep note, I know depending on how a photo is taken his skin tone will vary a little but at least I hope to get in the right direction..

Thanks you both for help

Debra
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Cindy Flood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 November 2012 at 00:44
Here is what I got with my skin balancing method described above.

-Cindy Flood
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Cindy Flood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 November 2012 at 02:52
Debra, I suspect that if you go back into ACR and white balance and fix exposure before taking into PS, you will have almost no work to do on this. I would take the WB dropper and put it on the gray between the pillows. There seems to be a color cast and that should take care of it. Get your exposure set to have a full histogram without clipping significant whites or blacks.
-Cindy Flood
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Mark L Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 November 2012 at 10:47
Looking at the Exif data in your photo, I see that you are using Manual exposure and manual white balance.

Manual exposure is fine -- in a studio situation it's really the best option -- but in this case I think you probably need to increase the exposure a bit by either opening up the aperture, increasing the flash power or just moving the flash a bit closer to the subject. Are you diffusing or bouncing the flash? - remember that light colored walls and ceilings will act as reflectors, particularly in a small space.

Actually, I suspect that the ambient light is playing a considerable part in the exposure of these photos. You are using a shutter speed of 1/20, which will allow a lot of the ambient light (daylight from a window?) to be recorded and if the flash is set to TTL or Auto it will be automatically quenched quite quickly and will act only as a fill. Try using a shutter speed of, say 1/125 sec, which will ensure that the flash dominates and will allow you to have more control over how your subject is lit. To reduce the amount of daylight in the exposure, you can probably just draw a curtain over the window.

And if you are relying on the flash for exposure, why use manual white balance? The simplest option is just to set the WB to 'Flash'. If any minor adjustment is needed that can be done in ACR. And as flash and daylight temperatures are more or less the same, this will also work if daylight is playing a part in the exposure.

It would help to know roughly what your set-up looks like -- a diagram of the layout, perhaps. Also what light sources are playing a part in the exposure and where they are relative to the subject.
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