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Nd filters..

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Debra View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Debra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Nd filters..
    Posted: 21 November 2012 at 12:08
I am interested in photos with nd filters. I love the capture of smooth water/sea..

As I live in Thailand and the sun is almost on top most of the day... Which would be a good one to get.. At the moment I cannot afford three filters... I have read best are 3' 6 and 9..

I don't live far from the sea so would like to have a go at this, we also have decent water falls when it's been raining or should I say monsoon...

I hope I can get some here or it will be another wait until march.. Lol

Debra
 



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stiuskr View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote stiuskr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2012 at 12:22
Most people tend to overdo it with waterfall shots. You'll start to get that effect at around 1/4 second shutter times, the longer you push it the more detail and contrast you'll lose in the flowing water shots. I'd suggest just the 3 and the 6 ND filters, you can stack them up to get to 9 if they are quality filters and stacking doesn't degrade the IQ too much. With the lowest ISO available and a tighter aperture, say f8 to f11, the ND 3 filter should get you what you want unless it's in a bright, high sunny condition.
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ratboy View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ratboy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2012 at 14:24
If you have a polariser for your lens, that can be useful to cut out a stop or two. I know diffraction sets in at around f8-f11 with most lenses, but don't be afraid to go higher, I'd avoid going much over f16.
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Bob Maddison View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Bob Maddison Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2012 at 15:05
Your first step should be to use your camera as it is now. Set the lowest ISO and a small aperture (f16?) and forget about any drop in IQ. Once you have taken a few trial photo, you will know where you are going and can then decide on which ND filters you need. Nothing beats experience!
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Post Options Post Options   Quote kerrath Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2012 at 17:28
Originally posted by stiuskr stiuskr wrote:

Most people tend to overdo it with waterfall shots. You'll start to get that effect at around 1/4 second shutter times, the longer you push it the more detail and contrast you'll lose in the flowing water shots.

My personal preference is to go MUCH longer than 1/4s. You can see individual bits of water at that speed, defeating the purpose. For me, the smooth buttery look of the water has to contrast starkly with surrounding elements like rocks, moss, trees, etc to make this technique work. With a short speed, it just ends up looking sort of half-assed/busy to me.

+1 on trying out polarizing filters first. They do a good job cutting out light and are essential ND in the way they cut it. Just be careful not to let the polarizing effect knock out details you want to retain like reflections or specular highlights.
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Debra View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Debra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2012 at 02:47
Thanks for replies I will try polarising filter first.. This may sound daft question but is manual setting the best..

Debra
 



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stiuskr View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote stiuskr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2012 at 03:24
Show us your waterfall pics
Show us your waterfall pics 2

In the Themed Views forum, there's 28 pages total and if you have an EXIF viewer you can see what others are using (when the EXIF is embedded) and the effects achieved with those settings.

Here's a google search for EXIF viewers, there's many to choose from, myself I have the Opanda version.
Rob Suits Jr.
a99 a77 a700 KM7D|Min24/2.8 So50/1.4 So50/2.8 Min85/1.4G Tam90/2.8 Tam180/3.5|Tam17-50 KM28-75D 70-200G1 70-300G 70-400G1|MFC-1000w/1200AF Metz54MZ-4i SonyF60 PW's x3
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Debra View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Debra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2012 at 06:37
Thanks stiuskr for replying will take a look..

Before reading latest reply I tried polorizing filter not having much luck so please bear with me..

I had to go as high as f29 .. any lower the sun was just too bright and then the water was not as blurred.. sadly its bright most of the day and prob the best time to be on beach is around 4 ish but then you have all the traffic and not a great place to drive when its dark just after 6..

no editing other than crop I was just trying on my small water feature, as you can see it does look blurry so thats something but I may need to get nd's lol and the water feature was in very slight shade

a 500
min 35-105
iso 200
f29 0.4



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Rno. View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Rno. Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2012 at 07:18
Water, or milk?

I like to show water, and that means a somewhat clear liquid, which forbids exposures longer than ~1/10".

But that is just my personal taste.
Ungeeking
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Debra View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Debra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2012 at 09:11
I can't go at 1/10 with polariser it makes the water non blurred .. That's how bright it is here.. Think I def need nds... It's 4pm and the su. Is still as bright..

Debra
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Bob Maddison View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Bob Maddison Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2012 at 10:12
A polarising filter might increase the exposure by one stop or perhaps just a little more. Whilst it has it own specialist applications, it isn't a substitute for an ND filter. However, you might consider one of the variable ND filters based on a pair of polarising filters, These are a relatively cheap option nowadays.
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napo View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote napo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2012 at 11:39
For smooth water pictures in place with lot of sun you will need at least something like ND -6 stops.....
Love the whole Tree - not just one branch

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Debra View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Debra Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2012 at 12:18
Thanks for more replies... It does look like I will get a nd filter or two...

Debra
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foot View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote foot Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2012 at 14:08
Debra-

if you have 2 circular polizer you can go all the way to "black"
- no light passes thru. this happens when the polizers are rotated
90 degrees from each other

if you only have a single polizer you can recreat this by hand-holding
a polirized sun glasses in front of the camera lens

btw, usually the less expensive, the more light it blocks

the more expensive, the more polorized light the filter lets in
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