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The buzz- using a Zoom iQ7

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wetapunga View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote wetapunga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: The buzz- using a Zoom iQ7
    Posted: 14 December 2017 at 20:17
So the background is I'm playing a bit more with video these days. And one recent gadget I've got is the Zoom iQ7, which turns my iPhone into a decent field recorder. (Which frees me from being limited to my Azden SMX-30 camera microphone).

Was recording sea-waves last night, and the track while nice, had an intermittent faint buzzing noise. Which sounds intrusive when the sound is dialed up. So I'm wondering if I should have put the phone into airplane mode. I suspect it might be RF interference from the phone looking for WiFi and bluetooth connections.

Of course, I'm open to other ideas also   
a7R, a77ii | Minolta 17-35mm G, 20mm f2.8, 35-105mm f3.5-4.5 O, 50mm f2.8 M, 70-210 f4, 85mm f1.4 G, 100mm f2.8 M, 300mm f4 G | Sony 16-50mm f2.8,CZ16-80mm f3.5-4.5, 70-200mm f2.8, 135mm f2.8 STF
 



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wetapunga View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote wetapunga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 December 2017 at 23:58
...did a test at lunchtime down by the stream on campus. It seems switching phone to airplane mode before using it as a field-recorder will eliminate the buzzes etc. I think that corroborates RF interference earlier
a7R, a77ii | Minolta 17-35mm G, 20mm f2.8, 35-105mm f3.5-4.5 O, 50mm f2.8 M, 70-210 f4, 85mm f1.4 G, 100mm f2.8 M, 300mm f4 G | Sony 16-50mm f2.8,CZ16-80mm f3.5-4.5, 70-200mm f2.8, 135mm f2.8 STF
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4paul View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote 4paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 December 2017 at 01:13
That certainly sounds right, but confusing. It seems to be made for iphones, so I would think it is RF isolated. That's a Lightning connector right? I thought Lightning only did digital signals (analog audio would of course be very susceptible to RFI). The Apple version of the mini jack (old fashioned 3.5mm headphone jacks) swapped the shield/ground and mic so it would often have problems (including not being able to use the headphone as an FM antenna).

It's powered from the phone right? If it had its own battery I'd say it's buzz from mismatched/ungrounded power, but I don't think that's the case. Hmmm. Unless the battery were really low, and the combination of powering the Zoom AND cell/wifi/BT etc put too much draw on the battery and the Zoom didn't get enough power resulting in buzz on the mic pickups.
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wetapunga View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote wetapunga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 December 2017 at 01:56
Originally posted by 4paul 4paul wrote:

That certainly sounds right, but confusing. It seems to be made for iphones, so I would think it is RF isolated. That's a Lightning connector right? I thought Lightning only did digital signals (analog audio would of course be very susceptible to RFI). The Apple version of the mini jack (old fashioned 3.5mm headphone jacks) swapped the shield/ground and mic so it would often have problems (including not being able to use the headphone as an FM antenna).

It's powered from the phone right? If it had its own battery I'd say it's buzz from mismatched/ungrounded power, but I don't think that's the case. Hmmm. Unless the battery were really low, and the combination of powering the Zoom AND cell/wifi/BT etc put too much draw on the battery and the Zoom didn't get enough power resulting in buzz on the mic pickups.


I'm happy to stay confused just so long as the sound stops
But you're right. It's a lightning connector. I also had the battery at over 80% charge both times. The phone is an iPhone SE.
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Miranda F View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Miranda F Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 December 2017 at 09:30
Phones talk to the base-station on their own. Not sure how frequently on the new systems (it was a while ago I was involved), but the RF (microwave) transmitting burst can get into any electornics connected or not if it is close. It gets demodulated into a buzz by the transistors inside the device.

Interestingly, most mobile phone systems use power management, which means if the phone is in a poor signal area, or is partially shielded, it transmits at higher power so the base-station can hear it => more interference.
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