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Case Study: Frankman on birding

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maewpa View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote maewpa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 April 2008 at 03:06
Thanks for the response, Frank.
Paul aka maewpa
 



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Micholand View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Micholand Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 April 2008 at 19:36
Thanks for providing an insight into your personal BIF photography - a well written article - and sharing those amazing pictures. Continue the good job, Frank!
/Michael

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Post Options Post Options   Quote iGrf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2008 at 11:28
Thank you for taking the time to write this down.
You have some great birds shots, congratulations
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ricardovaste Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 April 2008 at 16:02
thank you so much for takin the time to share your techniques/experiences with us frank. i didnt comment immediately, as i've been testing out your suggestions. sadly conditions have been fairly dull... and there isnt really a frequent 'flight path' (if that makes sense) here for any birds. ive been trying to practice the technique on pigeons believe it or not (!) but with no success - it gives me an even great appreciation for what results you achieve, especially with the 5D: its unbelievable.

i think a trip to a river is in need :)

Many thanks.
I photograph the moments in people's lives that mean the most to them: Richard Harris Photography
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Wētāpunga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 April 2008 at 23:20
A somewhat belated note of thanks for this articulate explanation Frankman. I haven't made many attempts on BIF, so now I know exactly what I do wrong .
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Post Options Post Options   Quote X-R-M Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2008 at 04:29
Frank, thank you for clear and well written article.
It makes me to try BIF using your advice.
I do have 5D only, but you proved that good results are possible with that camera.

Some switched to other systems to get good BIF pics...
Thanks again
Jerry
 



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Post Options Post Options   Quote SteveC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2008 at 05:09
Those are great pictures, Frank. Thanks a lot for sharing your techniques. I could have used some of them (as well as a longer lense!) on a herd of pronghorn that sprang from behind a hill I was hiking on the other day. They circled me at about 50-75 meters, steadily gaining speed, always seeming to be a bit ahead of me. I kept having to shift my feet. It would have helped greatly, I now think, to have positioned my feet more toward the direction they were heading and then follow them by turning my waist. Since i didn't anticipate them being there, I really hadn't any time to play around with various settings. Everything was shot on auto. A few are ok, but none are outstanding. I can hardly wait to go to the nearby lake and try some birds.

Steve
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Octupi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2008 at 05:47
Frankman...one question on the 300/4.

How do I set my focus limiter? I know it sounds silly, but for some reason this has eluded me.

Thanks in advance.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Frankman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2008 at 10:11
Richard - as you've experienced, good light is essential. Hang in there - it's not that toughonce you get the hang of it. Pigeons move pretty fast, so they're a real challenge.

chthoniid - the morephotos you take, the luckier you get. THe secret to success is to take LOTS of shots.

XRM - the 5D is a good performer. It taught me a lot. Once I got the A700, I was glad that I had leant so much using the 5D.

Steve - sounds like you found a great location. It's always hard when something "springs" up on you. I've sworn under my breath many times as I'm taking photos of a bunch of tail feathers. There's always a next time - that's what keeps me going back for more.

Octupi. To set the focus limiter on the 300/4, undo the screw knob, set your camera to manual focus, then turn the thick black focus ring to say 5 meters. Then turn the thin white metal ring anticlockwise until you hit some resistance. Then tighten the screw knob. All done. BTW, don't forget to put the camera back onto AF-C. I've forgotten on more than one occasion - I think I've leant my lesson!

And to everyone else - it's my pleasure to share my experience with you all.

Frank
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Post Options Post Options   Quote sandboa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 June 2008 at 07:43
Frankman,

Sorry for the tardy addition, but thanks for this writeup. Very interesting.

I also shoot lots of BIFs with the 700 and 300 f/4. It's a great lens for that. One thing I might add is that I get more keepers when I set the AF Area to Wide. It really makes a difference in "picking up" fast flying birds.

Chris
___-_________
Chris Harrison
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Maffe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 June 2008 at 08:25
After testing Cekaris big white lenses I can only say that I´m even more impressed with your BIF-shots
Thanks for sharing
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Frankman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 June 2008 at 12:07
Originally posted by sandboa sandboa wrote:

Frankman

I also shoot lots of BIFs with the 700 and 300 f/4. It's a great lens for that. One thing I might add is that I get more keepers when I set the AF Area to Wide. It really makes a difference in "picking up" fast flying birds.

Chris


Chris - thanks for taking following up and sharing your experiences. I might give wide AF another try. From memory, I did try it, but can't remember why I went back to spot AF. Something about old dog and new tricks I guess .

Maffe - thanks as well. It's challenging but fun. Such a good feeling when you nail a shot!

Frank
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ab012 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 June 2008 at 13:57
Actually I am also a fan of AF-wide for BIF - the a700 (unlike the 7D IMO) is quite trustworthy in this setting also :)

Mind you if AF-single is working well for you (as it obviously is!) then perhaps its just a case of different strokes for different folks!

Bernard

fun fun fun
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Bygum Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 June 2008 at 02:37
A great write up and case study Frank.
Great photo's.
I have made up my mind as to which lens after trying the 100-400L, I will settle for the 300L f4 + 1.4.

Will call soon.

Cheers.
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