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Little annoy with my ultra wide angle photos

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Post Options Post Options   Quote coyote1086 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Little annoy with my ultra wide angle photos
    Posted: 09 September 2022 at 00:54
During my visit to Paris/Brussels/Bruges/Ghent this summer, kind of the first time I took my Rokinon 12mm F2 (manual focus for E mount) for some real travel.

As phones nowadays are so powerful, most of the newer ones have ultra wide angle lens ( 13mm, 120 degrees field of view ), it seems like the pictures (my wife is using iPhone 13 Pro) are similar to the 12mm lens on my A6500. Sometimes I think it would be easier to use a phone + A6500 with 16-70Z instead of changing lens. And the photos from her phone is so vibrant and sharp while I will need to process my photos to get that colors.

And I look at the wide pictures and I do not get those wow factor much. I know it is probably my skill on using the lens not correctly, but luckily once in a while I would get something I think are pleasing.

Here are some photos (non processed) to illustrate what I am not happy about




Here is a photo of the Abbey at the top of Mont Saint Michel, I have no room to move back, all I can do was point up to get the whole scene. When I do that, the object/building in the picture is like a triangle.



Next, same location in portrait mode, seems a little better with more foreground, but still the same point up view.



Grand Place, seems okay but the tall tower is not straight. Not sure if shooting from a higher place will help but that is a luxury that I did not have.


This one from Bruges, was able to capture everything in, but the Belfry is bent


This next one is much better, with slight rotating the alignment, I might get a straight Belfry.


Paris Opera House, standing further away, I got the building straight, but lots of foreground and lots of people.


When I stand closer, again the triangle/trapezoid effect.

I was doing some research on fixing lens distortion in photoshop, seems like it can straighten the things. But I am cheap and my version of photoshop does not have that Adaptive Wide Angle filter. I tried to use the lens distortion filter and seems like I might be able to use the vertical perspective tool to make the building look straight, but I will need to have a much wider shot such that main building is inside the adjusted and cropped image. I guess in the future I will need to remember about this.

Any other tips that you have that could help me ? I kind of think when using UWA, try to keep the object in the top half might help, but I am not too sure now.
 



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QuietOC View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote QuietOC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 September 2022 at 02:24
That is natural perspective. All of them would look correct if you put your eye close to them. "Correcting" can make things look worse. I think you did pretty well on the later ones.

Holding the camera level will keep buildings from falling away. Then crop off the bottom of the photo in post to simulate a shift lens.

I have tilt-shift adapter, but there are not even mildly wide lenses that would work that well with it.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote T Snijder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 September 2022 at 07:25
Try to shoot vertical.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Snegren Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 September 2022 at 10:30
Sell your Rokinon 12 mm and get a LAOWA D-Dreamer 12mm F2.8 with shift converter. Works as a 17mm f/4 shift lens with the converter fitted and can be used as a 12 mm without converter but requires a Canon or Nikon to FE adapter because the shift converter has Canon or Nikon front mount. Excellent lens. If you want a bit wider, LAOWA does a dedicated 15mm shift lens.

Shift lenses are not convenient though, they require patience to get the verticals right.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote addy landzaat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 September 2022 at 11:04
Originally posted by T Snijder T Snijder wrote:

Try to shoot vertical.
I do this often when I want the building straight. Or I lean into the distortion.

Straight vertical:

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Post Options Post Options   Quote addy landzaat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 September 2022 at 11:05
Originally posted by coyote1086 coyote1086 wrote:

Paris Opera House, standing further away, I got the building straight, but lots of foreground and lots of people.
This is a fine picture, I like the people in front.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Almazar80 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 September 2022 at 14:02
As everyone else has posted, this is a natural consequence of using wide angle lenses and not shooting to the same horizontal plane as your image. When you tilt up, you introduce distortion that you see. You can correct this in post, but it can be time consuming and there are always inaccuracies to the correction due to the correction. The best solution is to go to a building or structure across your subject and get to a level where you can shoot without tilting the camera. Easier said than done (not possible most of the time). If you do decide to correct in post, add a lot of space around the subject since the correction will eliminate quite a bit of the scene.

The correction can make the image better. Or worse. It's a personal preference. I had to correct my indoor church pictures (and outdoor church pictures) in this manner. I sort of enjoy doing this (not really), but it can be worth it. I learned so much from seeing the work of others here in this forum. And, nice pictures.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote pegelli Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 September 2022 at 14:33
Here's an example of framing in the portrait orientation and not tilting the camera (keeping the sensor exactly vertical) and then cropping the top square. That avoids "falling lines" or also called the "keystone distortion". I was also standing on a small hill to elevate my position.



Obviously this only works if your wide angle is wide enough to get the building fully in the frame while keeping the sensor exactly vertical. Sometimes standing on a hill/bench/table/flower pot etc. can elevate your standpoint and keep the camera vertical.

In case that doesn't work you need to use software correction, but less is better, especially extreme corrections can start to look ugly, both due to pixel smearing/stretching as well as that it starts looking unnatural. Using a shift lens avoids the pixel smearing but in principle the perspective will look identical to a software correction, so again large shifts are better avoided. So going to a higher elevation and tilting the camera less will almost always improve the final resulting photo.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote XKAES Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 September 2022 at 14:44
Those of us who still use film can easily correct this when we make prints under the enlarger -- tipping the easel in the opposite direction.
Without that option, others have given good suggestions.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote owenn01 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 September 2022 at 16:07
I've suffered from this in the past and many of the above suggestions work - especially the vertical orientation and keeping the camera level with the horizon etc.

However, another great suggestion made to me was to correct the image in Photoshop using the 'Correction Crop' tool. I've found that one needs to think about the image at the taking stage first - think 'is this going to require a converging vertical correction?' and, if so, allow it a little extra space in the frame to make sur you don't crop the top or bottom off the subject. Once in PS it's a simple task to do the correction and it is genuinely amazing how good the correction tool can be. The following has been corrected using this tool and it's far simpler than using the perspective correction and/or rotation tool in other applications in PS:



Good luck in your search to get something you can use though. Take care and best regards, Neil.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote addy landzaat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 September 2022 at 16:45
Originally posted by XKAES XKAES wrote:

Those of us who still use film can easily correct this when we make prints under the enlarger -- tipping the easel in the opposite direction.
Without that option, others have given good suggestions.
Film still rules But yes, this is an advantage of the film workflow.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote coyote1086 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 September 2022 at 23:07
Thank you all of you for the suggestions and tips. I will remember to keep the sensor parallel to the buildings if possible, otherwise try to leave more room on the 4 sides so doing distortion corrections in PS will not crop the building off.

I will see what I can do in PS this time on those few images above. I guess for travel pics, these are okay. But for something more serious ( or more artistic ), I will have to spend more time to take the picture more carefully.

I just checked, iPhone also have the correction tools in the photo edit.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote XKAES Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 September 2022 at 03:11
You might need to use a wider-angle lens than you thought -- in order to keep the camera level AND get all of the subject in the scene. The only other option is to move further away -- or move UP.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote TomV Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 October 2022 at 22:22
Originally posted by XKAES XKAES wrote:

You might need to use a wider-angle lens than you thought -- in order to keep the camera level AND get all of the subject in the scene. The only other option is to move further away -- or move UP.


Or use a Tilt-Shift lens
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