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Phil Wood View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Phil Wood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 June 2022 at 21:43
Originally posted by alanfrombangor alanfrombangor wrote:

Phil, Birkenhead/Liverpool/Crosby (for the Gormley statues) would be good for a Dyxum DM.


It would break new round for me, apart from one short visit to Liverpool waterfront a few years back I have not been there at all.

Today's box is a wall box from the reign of George V. For some reason the regnal number is not included. Boxes from his son George Vi's reign do have the number, his father Edward VII's reign was marked by boxes with ER VII - so why not GR V? I have no answer, but I did see a royal cipher from the reign of George III on some cannon the other day - and it had G R 3.

Wall box, Bude (I like a box in a nice wall).


 



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Post Options Post Options   Quote Phil Wood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 June 2022 at 11:24
Today's Post Office mail box is of a much more modern type. Introduced in 1996 this is a Type M box, after a few decades of modernistic designs this was a return to a more classic look.

Lamp box, Type M, Newbury.




Edited by Phil Wood - 21 June 2022 at 11:29
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Phil Wood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 June 2022 at 12:23
Yesterday my dog walk took me past this example of the Post Office's attempts to replace the traditional Type A/B pillar boxes. It is a Type K box, introduced in 1980 and manufactured through to 2001.

Pillar box, Type K, Newbury.


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Post Options Post Options   Quote Phil Wood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 June 2022 at 23:08
Continuing my survey of UK post boxes here is one I visited today.

It is another rare design known as the Second National Standard produced by a Birmingham foundry from 18969 for a few years. They are not as scarce as the same foundry's fluted column pillar boxes, it is thought that there are about 30 surviving in uses. Given the scarcity I was surprised to find two within walking distance of my home.

Second National Standard wall box.


A99ii, Min AF 24-85 RS

Edited by Phil Wood - 28 June 2022 at 23:11
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Howard_S Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 June 2022 at 00:43

Gold post box | A5000 and E PZ 16-50

Another golden box, this one celebrating Lily van den Broeke, a woman from Oxford winning gold in the 2012 London Paralympics.

Seems like another age.
Howard Stanbury Instagram | Flickr | Web
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Phil Wood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 June 2022 at 09:25
Originally posted by Howard_S Howard_S wrote:


Another golden box, this one celebrating Lily van den Broeke, a woman from Oxford winning gold in the 2012 London Paralympics.

Seems like another age.


10 years is a long time, the paint could do with a touch-up.

This is a Type G box - a type I haven't shown yet. They weren't made for long, 1970s but I haven't found the exact dates. Fairly scarce these days but a number have had the gold paint treatment including a pair in Cheshunt for Laura Trott, the UK's most successful female Olympic athlete.
 



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Post Options Post Options   Quote alanfrombangor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 June 2022 at 12:52
I find the Type G boxes rather ugly in comparison with the round pillar boxes with the black skirt. This one looks particularly drab in faded gold, it'll be interesting to see if it reverts to red when repainted. 2012 really does seem a different world, there was more optimism then... and we were aall teen years younger!

That's a lovely early Victorian box, Phil, I have one from 2010 but with the collection day in a different place.



And here's a rarity from Welshpool

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Phil Wood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 June 2022 at 22:37
Originally posted by alanfrombangor alanfrombangor wrote:

I find the Type G boxes rather ugly in comparison with the round pillar boxes with the black skirt. This one looks particularly drab in faded gold, it'll be interesting to see if it reverts to red when repainted. 2012 really does seem a different world, there was more optimism then... and we were aall teen years younger!


While I agree that the gold is not as good as red I fear that the Royal Mail are currently saying that they will keep the 2012 gold boxes in gold. Not that I am offended by the colour very often - no gold medals round here!

Originally posted by alanfrombangor alanfrombangor wrote:

That's a lovely early Victorian box, Phil, I have one from 2010 but with the collection day in a different place.


The 'day' plate holder is a later addition (screwed on in the case of the two around here). Personally I think my example is cleverer - using the door jamb to prevent the day plate from being removed by all and sundry. Your example needed the addition of a lump of iron on the door to block the day plate holder. Then again yours actually has a plate in the holder, I guess they don't bother any more. Can you remember where you found yours?

Originally posted by alanfrombangor alanfrombangor wrote:


And here's a rarity from Welshpool

Possibly not as rare as the first one - there are apparently 171 surviving Edward VIII boxes, though many are wall rather than pillar boxes. The rarest working box (or equal rarest) is an Edward VIII wall box in Suffolk, the only one of it's type and reign still in use. If I'm ever that way I'll post a picture.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Phil Wood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 June 2022 at 23:03
After a few decades trying new designs they reverted to the old 1880s design of the A Type pillar box. The new bit on this particular example is that it has Royal Mail on it rather than Post Office. The change reflects the split-up of the General Post Office and the creation of the privatised Royal Mail Group to handle the mail side of the business.

A Type Royal Mail.


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Post Options Post Options   Quote alanfrombangor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 July 2022 at 12:53
Originally posted by Phil Wood Phil Wood wrote:

Can you remember where you found yours?

Bishops Castle. I also have a shot of the same design at Walton on the Wolds but the lettering is partly obscured by thick paint.

I read that the Edward VIII wall boxes had their doors changed apart from the one you mentioned which was missed. Pillar boxes remained with the cipher, perhaps because the doors were curved and bigger so more expensive to cast. There must have been a lot of hostility to the abdication for the king, "cancelled" in contemporary rhetoric!
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Phil Wood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 July 2022 at 13:46
Originally posted by alanfrombangor alanfrombangor wrote:

Originally posted by Phil Wood Phil Wood wrote:

Can you remember where you found yours?

Bishops Castle. I also have a shot of the same design at Walton on the Wolds but the lettering is partly obscured by thick paint.

I read that the Edward VIII wall boxes had their doors changed apart from the one you mentioned which was missed. Pillar boxes remained with the cipher, perhaps because the doors were curved and bigger so more expensive to cast. There must have been a lot of hostility to the abdication for the king, "cancelled" in contemporary rhetoric!


The rare one is a Ludlow box (a cheapo version of wall box) where the royal cipher is on a plate attached to the door - very easy to change; as you note, all but one have indeed been changed. The more robust cast iron wall boxes have the cipher cast on the door, but only 6 were installed in Edw VIII's reign and all have been removed or redoored. Many pillar boxes also had the doors changed but a number remain - it would be interesting to know exactly how many - similar to the Second National Standard wall boxes (~30) I'd guess.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote alanfrombangor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 July 2022 at 17:13
Phil, I was about to post a few images of Irish boxes but found this blog which is more interesting.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Phil Wood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 July 2022 at 22:19
Originally posted by alanfrombangor alanfrombangor wrote:

Phil, I was about to post a few images of Irish boxes but found this blog which is more interesting.

Thanks Alan, nice to see them in green - the original colour in all the UK though they changed to red long before Ireland gained independence.

Today a much more recent design, the current (for 10 years or so) version of a lamp box.

Lamp box type LB3426 England version.

A99ii, Min AF 50/1.4
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Phil Wood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2022 at 10:14
A special paint job today. The Royal Mail have got into the habit of painting post boxes to mark special occasions. The gold boxes for the 2012 Olympic gold medal winners are a long term version. This year four boxes have been painted to mark the Queen's platinum jubilee (one each in England, Scotland, Wale & Northern Ireland) - apparently platinum is a mix of purple and silver. I have to say the paint job is not impressive.

Jubilee pillar box, Windsor.

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