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Case Study: infrastellar on panoramas

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uff View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote uff Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Case Study: infrastellar on panoramas
    Posted: 02 November 2008 at 01:04
I am looking forward to seeing the Slovak translation on dynaxexpedicia...

Edited by uff - 02 November 2008 at 01:09
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Post Options Post Options   Quote uff Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 November 2008 at 01:03
Thank You for the case study Marek.
Excellent job.

I think I will stitch my first pano...
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Post Options Post Options   Quote brettania Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 October 2008 at 11:51
This is a duplicate of a post here. It's well worth reading the full thread which contains other stitching samples.

Originally posted by jbalpha jbalpha wrote:

Hello dear Dyxumers,

today I accidentally found a link to a something unusual - a photo stitching tool from Microsoft. This tool delivers quite nice results (to my taste), quite comparable with PTGui. The funny thing is that this is free (!!!).

For those, who are interested here's a linky.

Here is also some quick test, a panorama stitched from 9 images (taken hand-held, no tripod was used):


Hope you'll find that interesting.

JB



Edited by brettania - 30 October 2008 at 11:56
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Post Options Post Options   Quote pepcok Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 October 2008 at 11:33
brettania:
I have no problem giving credit to dyxum.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote brettania Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 October 2008 at 11:15
I asked Marek to write the article for Dyxum and helped with some editing of his writing.

But I would be happy if you were to use it for your site, perhaps with a credit saying "Originally prepared for Dyxum.com".

Effectively Marek retains the primary rights as the article was not "purchased" by us.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote pepcok Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 October 2008 at 10:54
Good work

We definitely want this article to appear on our www.dynaxexpedicia.net server..

Marek - can you please translate it back to Slovak? I hope this article is not dyxum-exclusive :)
 



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Post Options Post Options   Quote infrastellar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 October 2008 at 10:31
Reflekt:


"I suppose I cant get decent shots with just using my 'normal' ballhead. Do do you have a suggestion for what kind/brand of 'panoramic head' u need?"

I use nodal ninja 3 panoramic head, there are plenty of them on the market. But choose one, that is firm and light, so you will not leave it at home because of the weight...

"Do you use the smallest aperture (like an f11-22 or so) to get the whole thing sharp, or does it also depend on what you are shooting?"

For using the aperture, use the general rules as with the single photo. If there are subjects in the foreground and you need to include those in the backround, go for higher aperture. This varies from the focal lenght you use, and also from the distance you are focusing at.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote infrastellar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 October 2008 at 20:31
Michael has answered the question very well. What I thik, is that if you like taking panoramas, you will end up with the panoramic head. Dont torture yourself, and buy one in the beginning. The nodal point is inside of your lens, and varies from lens to another. Also varies from one focal lenght to another of your zoom lens.

If we speak about the speed, you simply need a tripod for your shots, if there are speeds that you cannot handhold. Simple ballhead should make its job, if you set it to spirit-level, and will be turning the camera around at its base. Still speaking about distant panoramas without any subjects in the foreground.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Micholand Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 October 2008 at 20:22
Marek, thanks for putting in the time and effort to make this wonderfully written tutorial


@maewpa:
If you try to balance and rotate the hand-held camera in its nodal point - which is the point inside your camera where the light rays converge and flip over, simply put - while taking the single frames and the shutter speeds are doable hand-held, then nice panos even can be done w/o a panohead. A normal tripod is fine, too, if there are no nearest and important subjects in the composition which should be included in the final panorama, otherwise you will get parallax errors and then of course stichting erros.
In general hand-held landscape panoramas are feasible whereas for interior shots it's nearly impossible and a panohead is a must have
/Michael

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Post Options Post Options   Quote maewpa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 October 2008 at 17:41
Great tutorial.

Same question about using a normal tripod head... I'd like to hear your thoughts about how much of a difference a dedicated head makes.

And also any tips for hand-held panoramas? For example, when you talk about having enough speed, do you mean just the speed you would normally handhold at, or is there anything else that we should take into account?

Hope they're not dumb questions... but you did invite them.
Paul aka maewpa
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Post Options Post Options   Quote DavidB Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 October 2008 at 16:10
This is very informative... thanks so much for sharing your expertise.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote startowa13 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 October 2008 at 15:52
Marek this is a gem! Thanks for posting this!
michael
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ianmarsh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 October 2008 at 15:32
I cannot wait to try this. I am sure a lot of us have looked at your shots with envy and now we have a (small) hope that we can emulate you. Thanks very much.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Frankman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 October 2008 at 14:05
Thank you for this excellent case study Marek. It is both inspirational and educational. I also found the "tip" about removing lens flare useful, not jut in terms of panoramas, but with single shots as well.

Frank
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