FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

2020 film challenge - photos and discussion

Page  <1 12131415>
Author
addy landzaat View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 22 April 2006
Country: Netherlands
Location: Netherlands
Status: Offline
Posts: 10865
Post Options Post Options   Quote addy landzaat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2020 at 22:16
You use the Epson scan software? It seems it makes a difference what software you use. Having said this, it seems the pictures seem sharp
The film seems a bit grainy for a 125iso film, but then HP5 for sure is more grainy.

Like the Bonapartedok the best.
Why not follow me on Instagram? @Addy_101
 



Back to Top
waldo_posth View Drop Down
Alpha Eyes group
Alpha Eyes group

Joined: 01 August 2012
Country: Germany
Location: Potsdam
Status: Offline
Posts: 5321
Post Options Post Options   Quote waldo_posth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2020 at 23:01
That's a very clear and clean set, Pieter - very nice!
"Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You are not here long." (Walker Evans)   http://www.flickr.com/photos/waldo_posth/
Back to Top
pegelli View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Dyxum Administrator

Joined: 02 June 2007
Country: Belgium
Location: Schilde
Status: Offline
Posts: 29807
Post Options Post Options   Quote pegelli Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2020 at 08:49
Thanks Addy and Harald.

Addy, to answer your question, I indeed use the Epson driver software for scanning and use it to make a 16 bit TIFF of the negative without converting it to a positive. Even though Negative Lab Pro recommends to use Vuescan or Silverfast and make a 16 bit DNG I like the results from this workflow best. I found Silverfast too expensive and not flexible enough and using a trial version of Vuescan (unlimited use, but heavily watermarked) I didn't like the results as much as I liked them using the Epson generated TIFF's. The fact you find the shots grainy is probably because I pushed the film to iso 200, so it can be expected the grain is more than "normal" 125 iso FP4+ but still less than HP5+.

Time for the second set of this roll


5: Fort d'Emines



6: Dry moat of fort d'Emines and its guardian



7: Resting place at the Schoonselhof cemetery in Antwerp



8: Commonwealth war graves at the Schoonselhof cemetery


All OM4T, 5+6: Tokina 35-70/2.8, 7: OM Zuiko 21/3.5, 8: OM Zuiko 135/2.8, no other exposure data recorded

I'll try to post the last 4 of the 1/3 keepers later today.
Mind the bandwidth of others, don't link pictures larger then 1024 wide or 960 pix high, see here
Back to Top
addy landzaat View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 22 April 2006
Country: Netherlands
Location: Netherlands
Status: Offline
Posts: 10865
Post Options Post Options   Quote addy landzaat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2020 at 09:24
It is probably just the sky, as with this second batch I do not really see any grain.

Why is there a cross among those standard Common Wealth wargraves? It that the "1 French war burial"
Wikipedia mentions?
Why not follow me on Instagram? @Addy_101
Back to Top
IanC View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie

Joined: 23 June 2020
Country: United Kingdom
Location: Warrington
Status: Offline
Posts: 143
Post Options Post Options   Quote IanC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2020 at 10:01
Originally posted by addy landzaat addy landzaat wrote:

I use my Sekonic 308s as a light meter (but I checked some readings with my Ricoh GR3) - but after seeing Thomas Heaton's latest YouTube video I am a bit worried about the results


My only film camera is my OM1 and it hasn't been used for many years. Well over 15 in fact! Apart from no longer having any facilities to process my own films, I'm also worried that the long period out of use will cause it to malfunction when taking pictures. I think the only way to find out is to put a film in it and see what results I get. Whilst I have a Sekonic 308 too the camera has a built in light meter and split screen focusing. When the restrictions are lifted I may go out and buy a roll of film. I've enjoyed reading about, and seeing, the results of the film challenge.

Ian
Back to Top
Bob J View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Dyxum Administrator

Joined: 23 December 2005
Country: United Kingdom
Location: London
Status: Online
Posts: 26074
Post Options Post Options   Quote Bob J Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2020 at 10:25
Originally posted by IanC IanC wrote:

My only film camera is my OM1 and it hasn't been used for many years. Well over 15 in fact! Apart from no longer having any facilities to process my own films, I'm also worried that the long period out of use will cause it to malfunction when taking pictures. I think the only way to find out is to put a film in it and see what results I get.


It might be an idea to 'exercise' the moving parts by winding on and firing the shutter a few times - less of an issue I think with the OM1, which is a mechanical shutter - but some cameras with electronic and electromagnatic components tend to get a bit 'stuck' over time.

Running through all the shutter speeds a few times with the back open should blow away the cobwebs and let you know if anything looks seriously slow...
 



Back to Top
IanC View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie

Joined: 23 June 2020
Country: United Kingdom
Location: Warrington
Status: Offline
Posts: 143
Post Options Post Options   Quote IanC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2020 at 10:33
Originally posted by Bob J Bob J wrote:

Originally posted by IanC IanC wrote:

My only film camera is my OM1 and it hasn't been used for many years. Well over 15 in fact! Apart from no longer having any facilities to process my own films, I'm also worried that the long period out of use will cause it to malfunction when taking pictures. I think the only way to find out is to put a film in it and see what results I get.


It might be an idea to 'exercise' the moving parts by winding on and firing the shutter a few times - less of an issue I think with the OM1, which is a mechanical shutter - but some cameras with electronic and electromagnatic components tend to get a bit 'stuck' over time.

Running through all the shutter speeds a few times with the back open should blow away the cobwebs and let you know if anything looks seriously slow...


Thanks Bob. IIRC the OM1 is all mechanical (apart from the meter) and has a shutter curtain so on a long exposure it should also be possible to check the lens aperture opens and closes too. I did take the precaution many years ago of removing the battery used for the metering system. In it's day it was used by some professional photographers so it was obviously fairly well made. I remember paying £175 for it at a time when my monthly salary was £75!

Ian
Back to Top
Bob J View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Dyxum Administrator

Joined: 23 December 2005
Country: United Kingdom
Location: London
Status: Online
Posts: 26074
Post Options Post Options   Quote Bob J Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2020 at 10:42
It was a very nice camera - and prices for the manual OM1 were similar to the prices for auto versions of other cameras (OM2 prices were about £100 more).

I have an OM1 myself - an early one from the first 3 months of production (there is a code under the pressure plate that tells you when it was made), but mine caps on 1/1000 and the viewfinder was filthy last time I saw it. I was going to borrow an OM2 from my brother-in-law, but all the lock-down stuff has prevented us from meeting up these last few months.
Back to Top
addy landzaat View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 22 April 2006
Country: Netherlands
Location: Netherlands
Status: Offline
Posts: 10865
Post Options Post Options   Quote addy landzaat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2020 at 10:48
Originally posted by Bob J Bob J wrote:

It might be an idea to 'exercise' the moving parts by winding on and firing the shutter a few times - less of an issue I think with the OM1, which is a mechanical shutter - but some cameras with electronic and electromagnatic components tend to get a bit 'stuck' over time.

Running through all the shutter speeds a few times with the back open should blow away the cobwebs and let you know if anything looks seriously slow...
Hmmm, why would that be the case? I would think mechanical cameras would have similar problems, as grease gets sticky just as much. Maybe condensers that get rusty or something?
Why not follow me on Instagram? @Addy_101
Back to Top
bonneville View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 19 May 2007
Country: United Kingdom
Location: East Midlands
Status: Offline
Posts: 1725
Post Options Post Options   Quote bonneville Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2020 at 10:51
Pieter, I really like the first four from your latest roll in your OM4T. I havenít taken any film for a couple of weeks, due to the latest lockdown, but will try and finish the roll in my M2.
Back to Top
addy landzaat View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 22 April 2006
Country: Netherlands
Location: Netherlands
Status: Offline
Posts: 10865
Post Options Post Options   Quote addy landzaat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2020 at 10:54
Originally posted by IanC IanC wrote:


My only film camera is my OM1 and it hasn't been used for many years. Well over 15 in fact! Apart from no longer having any facilities to process my own films, I'm also worried that the long period out of use will cause it to malfunction when taking pictures. I think the only way to find out is to put a film in it and see what results I get. Whilst I have a Sekonic 308 too the camera has a built in light meter and split screen focusing. When the restrictions are lifted I may go out and buy a roll of film. I've enjoyed reading about, and seeing, the results of the film challenge.

Ian
Be aware that the OM-1 was designed for 1.35v batteries and most modern batteries are 1.5v. So, metering might be slightly off. Not a big deal, but still. Maybe check if and how much it is off before you use it in earnest? But then, if you use a common negative film, it for sure will be within the latitude of that emulsion
Why not follow me on Instagram? @Addy_101
Back to Top
IanC View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie

Joined: 23 June 2020
Country: United Kingdom
Location: Warrington
Status: Offline
Posts: 143
Post Options Post Options   Quote IanC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2020 at 11:35
Originally posted by addy landzaat addy landzaat wrote:

Originally posted by IanC IanC wrote:


My only film camera is my OM1 and it hasn't been used for many years. Well over 15 in fact! Apart from no longer having any facilities to process my own films, I'm also worried that the long period out of use will cause it to malfunction when taking pictures. I think the only way to find out is to put a film in it and see what results I get. Whilst I have a Sekonic 308 too the camera has a built in light meter and split screen focusing. When the restrictions are lifted I may go out and buy a roll of film. I've enjoyed reading about, and seeing, the results of the film challenge.

Ian
Be aware that the OM-1 was designed for 1.35v batteries and most modern batteries are 1.5v. So, metering might be slightly off. Not a big deal, but still. Maybe check if and how much it is off before you use it in earnest? But then, if you use a common negative film, it for sure will be within the latitude of that emulsion


Thanks Addy, Yes, it's strange what things we can recall. I remember the battery is 1.35v and while I'm unsure of the prefix, the number was 625. In an old notebook I have the details written down in case I had to get one whilst out shooting. In storage in my loft I have the original instruction book. If I get a battery I can check the meter against my Sekonic 308 or my A77. As to film, back when my OM1 was in regular use for black and white Ilford FP4 was my go to stock with HP5 occasionally. Colour was Kodak Vericolor. I never really used much of any other brands. I'll pop down to my local camera shop when it reopens after our lockdown and see what they have in stock.

Ian
Back to Top
Bob J View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Dyxum Administrator

Joined: 23 December 2005
Country: United Kingdom
Location: London
Status: Online
Posts: 26074
Post Options Post Options   Quote Bob J Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2020 at 11:43
Originally posted by addy landzaat addy landzaat wrote:

Originally posted by Bob J Bob J wrote:

It might be an idea to 'exercise' the moving parts by winding on and firing the shutter a few times - less of an issue I think with the OM1, which is a mechanical shutter - but some cameras with electronic and electromagnatic components tend to get a bit 'stuck' over time.

Running through all the shutter speeds a few times with the back open should blow away the cobwebs and let you know if anything looks seriously slow...
Hmmm, why would that be the case? I would think mechanical cameras would have similar problems, as grease gets sticky just as much. Maybe condensers that get rusty or something?


In some cases the magnets seem to be overly affected by dirt build-up (where it comes from, who knows?) - A particular culprit for me is the Contax G1, where the shutter sometimes fails to fire and the film just winds on - I now put it on continuous and run it for 30-40 shots before putting a film in and this cuts down the number of blank frames to maybe 1 or two, as opposed to the worst films I've put through that camera, where I seem to have lost up to 12 shots on a roll.
Back to Top
IanC View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie

Joined: 23 June 2020
Country: United Kingdom
Location: Warrington
Status: Offline
Posts: 143
Post Options Post Options   Quote IanC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2020 at 12:20
Originally posted by Bob J Bob J wrote:

It was a very nice camera - and prices for the manual OM1 were similar to the prices for auto versions of other cameras (OM2 prices were about £100 more).

I have an OM1 myself - an early one from the first 3 months of production (there is a code under the pressure plate that tells you when it was made), but mine caps on 1/1000 and the viewfinder was filthy last time I saw it. I was going to borrow an OM2 from my brother-in-law, but all the lock-down stuff has prevented us from meeting up these last few months.


I've not looked at the code and don't know when the camera was made, but I think I bought it around 1974/5 from new so about two or three years after first entering production. It's not an OM-1n. I did have an OM-2, but the mirror kept locking up so I sold it on. I'd been a Pentax SLR user previously.

Ian
Back to Top
Dyxum main page >  Forum Home > Dyxum Photographs > Dyxum Challenges Page  <1 12131415>

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.

Monitor calibration strip

Dyxum.com - Home of the alpha system photographer

In memory of Cameron Hill - brettania

Feel free to contact us if needed.