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After taking pictures in light rain/drizzle?

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balacau View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote balacau Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: After taking pictures in light rain/drizzle?
    Posted: 13 September 2019 at 20:29
Hi everyone.

I've recently been looking through some of my older lenses and I've seen what is obviously reside left from taking pictures in the rain, the residue left from when the rain drops dried properly.

I've had previous experience with lens fungus (which has also claimed a Minolta 35-70mm F4 sadly) and with that experience behind me, I let the camera lens dry out properly.

That being said, apart from the obvious only taking the lens cap off when the camera is in use or using filters; what do people in here do after using their lenses in wet/rainy conditions and you have water drops on the lens front element? Do you use anything to clean this or do you just make sure it dries out by itself? Obviously there are camera and lens covers which certainly have their uses but you still need to expose the front element to take a picture anyway.

I have to admit I hate using my camera gear in the rain and in wet conditions...I typically reserve an older lens for that job.

Thanks.
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bharnois View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote bharnois Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 September 2019 at 20:48
I use Zeiss cleaner on the gear and Zeiss lens cleaner on the glass. Letting the water dry by itself may leave calcified deposits that are hard to remove.
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balacau View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote balacau Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 September 2019 at 21:47
Fair point there really.

Previously I've always been more concerned with wearing the coating off the lens (which is why I don't understand why the coating isn't on the inside of the lens really).

Thanks

Originally posted by bharnois bharnois wrote:

I use Zeiss cleaner on the gear and Zeiss lens cleaner on the glass. Letting the water dry by itself may leave calcified deposits that are hard to remove.
Understanding is a 3-edged sword. Your side, their side and the truth.
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waldo_posth View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote waldo_posth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 September 2019 at 19:51
As a preventive measure against fungus I use a medical desinfection spray which also works as a fungicide (not spraying on the lens, of course, but using it on a damp piece of cloth to clean the lens body). It's usually based on some alcohol that evaporates, but using some dry piece of cloth to remove its remnants will finish the job.
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balacau View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote balacau Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 September 2019 at 21:57
Good bit of information there, thanks for that.

Originally posted by waldo_posth waldo_posth wrote:

As a preventive measure against fungus I use a medical desinfection spray which also works as a fungicide (not spraying on the lens, of course, but using it on a damp piece of cloth to clean the lens body). It's usually based on some alcohol that evaporates, but using some dry piece of cloth to remove its remnants will finish the job.


Thank you for all the tips and assistance. I picked up a cleaning kit today from my local retailer (while at the same time getting to briefly handle an a7-III) that includes 3 lenspens (for different uses) and a number of microfibre cloths.

Sadly as of late I've had two lenses which have succumbed to fungus but I am also somewhat grateful that both of these were 2nd hand lenses and were stored away from the rest of my gear anyway. Now that I have a pencil torch, I'll be checking on the others more frequently. It appears that lens-related fungus issues isn't quite as rare as I would have thought and especially for older lenses, I'll be keeping a close eye out in future.

Thanks again.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote LAbernethy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 September 2019 at 02:17
Active weather usually makes for challenging photography. I keep a rain sleeve in my kit with a terry cloth hand towel and a microfiber lens cloth for drying off the camera and lens ASAP if wet from rain or snow. Winter is a challenge with the old metal Minolta lenses like the "secret handshake", they really retain the cold and fog horribly. In the summer I set out a couple of lenses at a time with the front cap off and white Minolta rear cap on, angled so the sun shines through the lens roughly 20-30 minutes or so as part of ongoing maintenance. So far no problems.
 



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Jozioau View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Jozioau Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 September 2019 at 04:11
Originally posted by balacau balacau wrote:

Hi everyone.

I've recently been looking through some of my older lenses and I've seen what is obviously reside left from taking pictures in the rain, the residue left from when the rain drops dried properly.

That being said, apart from the obvious only taking the lens cap off when the camera is in use or using filters; what do people in here do after using their lenses in wet/rainy conditions and you have water drops on the lens front element? Do you use anything to clean this or do you just make sure it dries out by itself?

Thanks.


Going back to the OP, I have always installed protective filters on the fronts of all my lenses. I know some purists frown on this, but my take is that good quality UV filters (and other special effects filters like CPL or ND) do not detract from IQ, and do indeed protect the lens from dirt, dust, rain or other moisture, scratches and even accidental impact.
Should a front filter get damaged, it's relatively inexpensive to replace.
Works for me.
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addy landzaat View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote addy landzaat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 September 2019 at 09:11
Originally posted by Jozioau Jozioau wrote:

Going back to the OP, I have always installed protective filters on the fronts of all my lenses. I know some purists frown on this, but my take is that good quality UV filters (and other special effects filters like CPL or ND) do not detract from IQ, and do indeed protect the lens from dirt, dust, rain or other moisture, scratches and even accidental impact.
Should a front filter get damaged, it's relatively inexpensive to replace.
Works for me.
Of course do UV and clear filters detract from IQ, though the better ones less so. In situations where there is a risk of dirt, dust, rain or other moisture possibly effecting your lens, I think there is a good case to be made for filters. For protection against scratches and most accidental impacts, use a lenshood (works with most lenses). I am always worried that filters get stuck when you hit them slightly - as lenses that are worth to put an expensive filter on, can handle a slight bump it is not worth the risk.

Having said all of this, the IQ difference is minimal with good filters and if using a filter gives you peace of mind, use them!

Back on topic: just dry it with a towel and put it in dry place after the rain. Most cameras can handle a slight drizzle, even if they are not weatherproofed.
Back in the day I was using my KM Dynax 7D in this rain:

I was not thinking about the rain as I was standing next to a guy using a Canon EOS 1D and I did not realise his camera was weatherproofed. But my 7D was fine afterwards.
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