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Alpha/Maxxum/Dynax 7 Rewind at 36 exposures

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neilt3 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote neilt3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 June 2020 at 09:48
Another option for the A mount shooter is the Minolta 9000AF .
Manual film advance ( if no motor drive is fitted ) and manual film rewind ( likewise ) .
Shoot a roll of film until it won't wind on any further .
Nice camera to use , as long as you don't mind the slow auto focus .
Just need to find one whose aperture stopdown mechanism still works .
see my photostream on flickr;
http://www.flickr.com/photos/neilt3/
C & C welcome.
 



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Miranda F View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Miranda F Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 June 2020 at 10:42
My old Rollei 35 (the miniature 35mm camera) had fully manual film wind and I could take 37 or 38 pictures on that before it got to the end-stop and I had to re-wind; but the last picture always had a join in it where the sensitive film was taped to the piece fixed in the drive drum.
I learned never to trust that the last picture on a roll would be usable...

If you really want 37 or 38, you have to put the film in the camera in blackout and don't wind on before shooting. I used to have a camera bag with a built-in darkroom I could do that with (a zip compartment with side access through armholes with tight wrists). But that means an older manual-wind camera.
Miranda F & Sensorex, Sony A58, Nex-6, Dynax 4, 5, 60, 500si/600si/700si/800si, various Sony & Minolta lenses, several Tamrons, lots of MF primes and *far* too many old film cameras . . .
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addy landzaat View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote addy landzaat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 June 2020 at 16:06
That works with manual cameras but not with modern cameras with motorised winders.
Why not follow me on Instagram? @Addy_101
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Bob J View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Bob J Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 June 2020 at 19:09
The moral of the following story is "if it ain't broke, don't fix it".

I do like getting those extra shots, so had been looking at this thread with interest. I had a roll of Ilford PAN 400 in my 7 and was currently at frame 23 - it occured to me I could wind the film back (leader out), rub off the patch and reload, advancing the film to frame 24...

Anyhow, here is what went wrong. I'd set the camera to manual rewind. I put the PAN 400 back in the camera after going to work with a flat-headed screwdriver... Set to shutter priority, covered the lens and hit the shutter release. Problem was the camera detected resistance at frame 3 and said to rewind... But the rewind didn't take the film all the way, so the back would not open.. AAAGH!

Should you find yourself in this situation, there is a get-out as detailed by member arilds back in 2010...

Originally posted by arilds arilds wrote:

Did you try the steps below to override the film lock? Sorry I saw this thread too late in case this could have helped.


1.Turn the main switch off.

2.While pressing ISO and AE-Lock buttons turn on the camera.

3.Display should now show "Back cover can now be opened"


If you want to cancel the deactivation of the film lock without opening the back cover repeat steps 1 and 2.


If this fails unscrew the screw just below the PC terminal, and remove the small panel. Slide the inside lever down to open the back cover.


So that was alright, and after recovering the film in a dark bag, I was go again. I went back to auto rewind and changed batteries, trouble was the rewound roll kept autodetecting and rewinding, so in the end I detensioned the roll as much as I could and shook the camera gently to eliminate any resistance. Now I've got the camera back where it was, with the cassette telling the camera to go until frame 48.

What it actually does is anybody's guess, but I will report back. Needless to say there were times when I wished I hadn't started - maybe I don't need those extra couple of frames that much...
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Miranda F View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Miranda F Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 June 2020 at 09:24
I think the trick is to make sure you take the *one* picture you want and to check the settings carefully before you do. I've never been that good, and always end up taking several with slightly different viewpoints.
Miranda F & Sensorex, Sony A58, Nex-6, Dynax 4, 5, 60, 500si/600si/700si/800si, various Sony & Minolta lenses, several Tamrons, lots of MF primes and *far* too many old film cameras . . .
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