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"Birdscapes" - does it work?

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nandbytes View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote nandbytes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: "Birdscapes" - does it work?
    Posted: 25 October 2019 at 00:00
First time in part of the world (i.e. critics corner), so bear with me....

I don't know if this is something that's been done to death or common or if it even works (may be its a terrible idea)

But its something I have tried to "see" and photograph a few times when the setting allows for it. I have a few pictures of birds but in a more landscape-like setting than a the standard get as close as possible shots!

#1


#2


#3 - same as above with selective colour for obvious reason. if selective colour feels like -> I don't blame you


#4 - less leafy and more watery setting (though I am pretty sure this is common)


if people feel I should stop wasting time go back to what I normally do and get close to these I shall also oblige
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pegelli View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote pegelli Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 October 2019 at 08:31
I like them Anand, the first the pose of the Egret is special and the frame of nature around is helping to bring that out. I also like the original version of the kingfisher, for me the fall colours in the background add an extra colour contrast with the bird that the selective coloured version misses. The selective coloured version feels lees "natural" to me which I'm not sure is something you want to achieve. The fourth is just nice, not filling the whole frame with this type of background is indeed more common.

I think there is no right or wrong between close vs. providing the environment/context, both have their place and can result in good photo's.
Mind the bandwidth of others, don't link pictures larger then 1024 wide or 960 pix high, see here
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Miranda F View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Miranda F Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 October 2019 at 12:43
Absolutely!
I agree, and not only because I don't have the lenses (or the skill and patience ) to get amazing close-ups.
I like your pictures, Anand, and I think the ones you show here are almost perfectly framed. I'd only comment that I personally find human and animal subjects look better looking to the centre from a short distance away (not necessarily the 1/3 often suggested) so I would probably put the heron a bit to the left and the razorbills nearer the centre.

Interestingly, I've been thinking exactly the same as you about train pictures. Almost everyone seems to want either close-ups or tight crops from further away (and to be fair they've been doing this for a century) but I prefer to see the train in a setting.
Tight crops are okay of you're making an identification guide, or if you're hoping to wow your audience with your skill at getting close-ups, but they can get terribly boring and it's also very far from how most of us actually see birds (or trains).
So, no, Anand, don't give up your concept - run with it, explore more or less, and keep us in the loop!
Miranda F & Sensorex, Sony A58, Nex-6, Dynax 4, 5, 60, 500si/600si/700si/800si, various Sony & Minolta lenses, several Tamrons, lots of MF primes and *far* too many old film cameras . . .
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Post Options Post Options   Quote nandbytes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 October 2019 at 09:19
Thank you folks for commenting

As for the Kingfisher my missus said she could barely notice it so I felt selectively colouring would help that

But personally I prefer the selectively coloured one simply because I think its the only place where it actually doesn't seem too cheesy and adds a sombre look/feel to the picture.

@Miranda: Interesting you should mention not having enough reach/lenses. These were taken with the same lenses I take close-ups with. First one was shot at 560mm and kingfisher at 600mm.

I actually find its really hard to find a setting that works for such pictures. Simply zooming out to 100-200mm from a close-up picture/framing just results in a tiny bird with rubbish background and ambiance.

Interesting point on trains, I will explore this also
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Hezu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 October 2019 at 11:19
I think I will voice a nod more critical opinions on these:

1. Perhaps bit too central composition and despite that these are "birdscapes" I think tighter framing might been better...

2. & 3. Somehow I think that the position of the bird in the frame should be different: perhaps more conformant with the rule of thirds and the bird closer to the right edge.

3. As a positive thing: the selective colouring works fine.

4. In its current form this is quite boring picture IMHO. I think lower shooting angle would have made this more interesting.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote stevo71 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 October 2019 at 11:40
I like a pulled back bird shot that showcases the environment as much as the bird especially when composed well.
a99ii | Tamron 90mm f/2.8 | Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 | Sony 50mm f/1.4 | Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 | CZ 16-35mm f/2.8 | Sony 70-400mm G2
 



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Post Options Post Options   Quote Kilkry Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 October 2019 at 12:34
I quite like these. The norm is bird faces close up, "tight crop", and "birdscapes" are a nice alternative. I agree with Hez on nr 1, at least that the bird would perhaps fit better some ways down and to the left.

Now where is that Oktoberfest..
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nandbytes View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote nandbytes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 October 2019 at 21:09
Thank you folk for commenting. As for the framing these are straight out of the camera (been trying to compose as much as possible in camera). But there's plenty of pixel in there to cropin and re-frame.

As per advice above I have reframed #1-3 to be more rule of thirds friendly (#4 was just meant to be an example of something I felt was more common than first 3)

#1m2


#2m2


#3m2
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Fred_S Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 October 2019 at 08:26
For me the m2 versions work slightly better, still showing enough of the environment, but just a bit more emphasis on the birds.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote nandbytes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 October 2019 at 11:43
if I may say so in case of the kingfishers I like second re-done version (a little more cropping could also work). In case of the Heron I prefer my original despite mostly central composition (I am not one to follow rules )
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Dena View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dena Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 October 2019 at 18:18
I appreciate a tight detailed bird photo, but like them in environment better. They can still be large in the photo in that case as well. I see it as documentary versus story telling.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Miranda F Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 October 2019 at 06:07
Originally posted by Fred_S Fred_S wrote:

For me the m2 versions work slightly better, still showing enough of the environment, but just a bit more emphasis on the birds.

+1
Miranda F & Sensorex, Sony A58, Nex-6, Dynax 4, 5, 60, 500si/600si/700si/800si, various Sony & Minolta lenses, several Tamrons, lots of MF primes and *far* too many old film cameras . . .
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