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Topic ClosedBugs and Spiders (13)

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Micholand View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Bugs and Spiders (13)
    Posted: 08 August 2012 at 18:40
/Michael

DWEs don't grow on trees! | Posting images&links FAQ
 



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Hols52 View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 August 2012 at 19:10
First one in here then - spider in web with some food





Graham
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 August 2012 at 08:25
Australian Huntsman - the can be up to 15cm span. Painful bite but not poisonous - just big, fast, and scary.
1


2

A77, MIN 100/2.8 macro

Howard
7D turned A77,77M2,MIN 50/1.4,MIN100/2.8macro,Sig10-20,F4-5.6,SAL70-300G,18-250,CZ16-80,SAL70-200/2.8,75-300,24-80/2.8SAM, TAm 150-600G2

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Wētāpunga View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 August 2012 at 09:29
The Diplurid Hexatheles hochstetteri.
Unusually for primitive mygalomorphs, this has 6 spinnerets rather than 4.

Photo taken at night, with 90/2.8 macro, 6x Raynox achromat diopter, Sony Macro Twin Flash.

Body (not cropped)


Close up of front legs

This shows the twin spurs on the tibia and its curved form to seize prey

Close up of Carapace
α7riii, α9- Voigtländer 15/4.5, 110/2.5 M; Zeiss Loxia- 21/2.8, 35/2, 50/2 & 85/2.4, Zeiss Batis- 85/1.8 & 135/2.8; Sony 24-105/4 G; Sigma 70/2.8 M; Tamron 150-500 f5-6.7; Sony SAL 135/2.8 STF
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 August 2012 at 11:57
Oh how I wish I lived down under among these gentle beauties -

Great close ups Howard and Brendan! Are the claws and curved part of the front legs of Hexatheles some kind of grasping structure to catch prey and/or hold hands with a boyfriend or girlfriend?

Edited by pdeley - 15 August 2012 at 12:07
a450, a500, a65, a7, 700si & other 35 mm bodies, Sig 15-30, sam 30 2.8 macro, Pentax 40 2.8 pan, Sig 70 f2.8 macro, Vivi 90 f2.8 macro, Mino 100-400 apo, 300 f4, 500 f8, 600 f4
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 August 2012 at 21:42
Originally posted by pdeley pdeley wrote:



Great close ups Howard and Brendan! Are the claws and curved part of the front legs of Hexatheles some kind of grasping structure to catch prey and/or hold hands with a boyfriend or girlfriend?


It's part of prey capture. Normally you don't see these Diplurids out of their tunnels. They leap out when prey triggers a warning thread- the front legs wrap around the victim, the curved tibia accommodates the shape, the spikes ram into the body, and then the fangs descend down, injecting venom into the trapped prey.

They're very successful predators
 



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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 August 2012 at 04:33
Agelenids are another common web-builder in NZ, and construct a large sheetweb. The most common species in my local forest is the Cambridgeas.

I took these shots of a male, suspended underneath his sheet on Tuesday night. They are a nocturnal species afterall. Lighting came form the Sony twin macro flash and the 90/2.8 macro had a 6x Raynox. I've moved away from extension tubes to the diopters for nocturnal photography. The reason is the extension tubes make the image slightly dimmer. Which at night time when you're peering at a bunch of minute spider eyes to find the focal point, is a pain.

Here's the non-cropped version


The cropped version was to draw attention to the arrangement of the eyes and the boss on the side of the chelicerae (fangs)


if anyone cares...it is a male :)



Edited by wetapunga - 17 August 2012 at 04:41
α7riii, α9- Voigtländer 15/4.5, 110/2.5 M; Zeiss Loxia- 21/2.8, 35/2, 50/2 & 85/2.4, Zeiss Batis- 85/1.8 & 135/2.8; Sony 24-105/4 G; Sigma 70/2.8 M; Tamron 150-500 f5-6.7; Sony SAL 135/2.8 STF
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 August 2012 at 15:06
It sure looks like a female.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 August 2012 at 16:42
Yes looks female from here to, pink palipeds, but dont get this species here :).

Tim
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 August 2012 at 01:54
Originally posted by tpetpe tpetpe wrote:

Yes looks female from here to, pink palipeds, but dont get this species here :).

Tim


I think I can see the confusion. It's a sexually dimorphic species and the female has a proportionality larger abdomen (often frustrating in focus shots) and the male has long, slender pedipalps (females are relatively shorter). The bulbous structure for spermatozoa aren't obvious.
α7riii, α9- Voigtländer 15/4.5, 110/2.5 M; Zeiss Loxia- 21/2.8, 35/2, 50/2 & 85/2.4, Zeiss Batis- 85/1.8 & 135/2.8; Sony 24-105/4 G; Sigma 70/2.8 M; Tamron 150-500 f5-6.7; Sony SAL 135/2.8 STF
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 August 2012 at 03:32
Some six-legged and (briefly) four-winged critters for a change: termites performing nuptial acrobatics in the back yard of my host and colleague's house here in Cordoba, Argentina. They came out right after the last downpour ending a 12-hour storm (which in turn ended a 4-month long drought). Here's a winged contender:



They were literally falling out of the sky in pairs - the aspiring kings grab a future queen and both tumble down on the ground, and if he can hold on then both of them almost immediately shed their wings. This happens so fast (and the remaining dark clouds made the scene so somber) that my few shots of the moment were all grotesquely blurred.

The princess then runs around over the ground looking for a safe place to bury down, all with her prince charming in tow, like this:



If he loses his hold then she'll stop and wait for him to get his act together & catch up with her royal bottom again. Apparently a happy ending isn't guaranteed, because the princes in question are not really endowed with great eyesight or common sense and easily go off circling away from their Lost Love. Maybe it's that, like typical men, they are unwilling to admit to a mistake and ask for directions? Here's a last one where the focus didn't catch both heads very well, because her highness was going at full trot, but it nicely shows the size difference between both royals.




All with a500 and SAM 30 2.8 macro.
a450, a500, a65, a7, 700si & other 35 mm bodies, Sig 15-30, sam 30 2.8 macro, Pentax 40 2.8 pan, Sig 70 f2.8 macro, Vivi 90 f2.8 macro, Mino 100-400 apo, 300 f4, 500 f8, 600 f4
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 August 2012 at 12:51
One from this morning, in almost perfect symmetry


A700 + Min 100/2.8 macro D
You can see the April Foolishness 2022 exhibition here Another great show of the talent we have on Dyxum
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 August 2012 at 01:45
News for arachnophiles here

Howard
7D turned A77,77M2,MIN 50/1.4,MIN100/2.8macro,Sig10-20,F4-5.6,SAL70-300G,18-250,CZ16-80,SAL70-200/2.8,75-300,24-80/2.8SAM, TAm 150-600G2

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 August 2012 at 07:12
Originally posted by happyjack happyjack wrote:

News for arachnophiles here


... with the usual dumb headline. Are headline writers required to be clueless?
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