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Capitol Reef, Part 4

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Almazar80 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Almazar80 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Capitol Reef, Part 4
    Posted: 20 June 2024 at 01:46
We spent a few more hours at Capitol Reef (the second half day). It was mostly cloudy, but the place is incredibly fascinating. We got started a little bit late, as I was up early taking out of focus pictures of the Milky Way. The last major collection from our Utah trip.

1.



2.



3.



4.



5.



6.



7.



8.



9.



10. Preserved cabin of Behunin Family, one of the early settlers



11.



12.




And pictures on the wall.


13.



14.



15.




Thanks for looking.
 



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MichelvA View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote MichelvA Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 June 2024 at 07:55
Great series again. For me #1 wins overall; i especially like the composition with the flowers in the foreground and the relative height of the sky in the frame. In #9 and 11 we see a wonderful dark sky; i would have love to see more of that. The pictures on the wall are great to watch and a shot like The Castle should always be there. TFS Winston   
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Almazar80 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Almazar80 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 June 2024 at 13:59
Thanks for the comments. The thing about the light that morning is that things were changing so quickly. Less than ten minutes after taking #5 (and an accompanying shot with the pinkish-orange soil), everything reverted to shades of brown and red. I probably could have taken my 20mm lens out for #10, but it was drizzling and I got a little lazy.

The cabin was interesting. The settler had a rather large family (they had eighteen children in their lifetimes). The younger children stayed in the house to sleep, while the older girls slept on a covered wagon and the older boys slept in alcoves by the cliffs nearby. According to the writeup, the family only stayed in the cabin for a year. They tried to plant fruit trees but the Fremont River flooded often enough that they could never get any yield from their efforts. Eventually, they moved to a Fruita, a few miles down the road (very close to the park visitor center). It's really interesting to read about the hardships endured by the early settlers of the west. Even now, moves are never easy.

Edited by Almazar80 - 20 June 2024 at 14:09
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4paul View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote 4paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 June 2024 at 15:32
You did well showing the geology in 7-8-9. My favorites are 7 and 13 for the color and abstract patterns (including drawings). Yeah no grocery stores, they brought seeds, but if the seeds wash away ... then what?
There is a difference between a shaky or out-of-focus photograph and a snapshot of clouds and fog banks. - Schrödinger
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Almazar80 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Almazar80 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 June 2024 at 19:28
Seeds were probably available in the small towns that dotted the landscape, including Junction, which is now known as Fruita (a ghost town, but fruits are still grown by the National Park Service). I wish I took a picture of the Mail Tree, a tree that has been in place for at least 150 years. Apparently, they used to drop off mail and pick up mail by that tree.

For someone who loves history, I did very little research before going to this part of the country. Now that I am doing a little bit more reading, this part of the Colorado Plateau has a very interesting past. And there surviving photographs of the area from the late 19th century. And the Mail Tree stands tall, in that century and in this century. What stories that tree can tell.

Capitol Reef, Escalante, Kodachrome Basin, Bryce Canyon. All within a two hour radius. A trip to bountiful indeed.
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MichelvA View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote MichelvA Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 June 2024 at 09:51
Originally posted by Almazar80 Almazar80 wrote:


...The settler had a rather large family (they had eighteen children in their lifetimes). ... Even now, moves are never easy.

Great story Winston, this contributes to these beautiful scenes.
Respect Observe Capture Enjoy
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