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Disk re-partitioned: speed up

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Post Options Post Options   Quote happyjack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Disk re-partitioned: speed up
    Posted: 19 February 2019 at 02:50
I did have my 3TB HDD @7200rpm divided in to 2 partition:
D for my photos, (but LR catalogue on mm SSD C drive)
E for Docs & Data.
I was running out of room for E so rather than expand, I transferred E to a another drive (just happened to be a spare 2TB)and then expanded the D to the full drive.
Wow - LR previews now load up really fast,blink and they are there,
the "new" HDD E drive is also faster to load docs.
7D turned A77,77M2,MIN 50/1.4,MIN100/2.8macro,Sig10-20,F4-5.6,SAL70-300G,18-250,CZ16-80,SAL70-200/2.8,75-300,24-80/2.8SAM, TAm 150-600G2

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horizon View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote horizon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 February 2019 at 02:16
G'day Howard,

The resizing of partitions did not do the speed up, it was freeing up space. That how HDD's perform and how long it takes to identify where each file is located in bits & bytes.

Although my personal preference as it has been for 20 years in I.T has always been, 1 physical drive = 1 logical partition, that is unless the drive is being used only for a sandpit (I.T testing). It just costs more to have more physical drives, but works out better in the long term.

A HDD when it is empty, you have available all its capable performance, as it fills up, then the performance begins to drop as you transfer data onto it, and it can be measured lineal in time and transfer speeds, ie: 90% freespace = 90% of its capable performance, 50% freespace = 50% of its capable performance, 25% freespace = 25% of its capable performance. In both search time and transfer speeds. The fuller the drive the longer it takes to identify all bits of each file.

The same thing also applies to SSD's. The more data stored and the less freespace, and the slower the performance. It is sheer physics both literal and logical.

For me personally, I prefer to have at least 3 times the amount of storage capacity than what I actually need at the time of purchase of said storage. 6 Years ago I purchase 3x 4TB HDD's for backups. At the time I only had about 1.75TB data. I now have 3.5TB Data on each 4TB drive and I now need to look for HDD's with at minimal 14TB capacity, but preferably 16TB capacity with multiple drives, for the backup.

Others that have worked in I.T may have their own opinion but what I mention above has served me well over many years.

Regards,
Craig

Please dont edit my photo's
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happyjack View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote happyjack Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 February 2019 at 04:50
aha - thanks for the info.
7D turned A77,77M2,MIN 50/1.4,MIN100/2.8macro,Sig10-20,F4-5.6,SAL70-300G,18-250,CZ16-80,SAL70-200/2.8,75-300,24-80/2.8SAM, TAm 150-600G2

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sybersitizen View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote sybersitizen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 February 2019 at 06:35
Originally posted by horizon horizon wrote:

A HDD when it is empty, you have available all its capable performance, as it fills up, then the performance begins to drop as you transfer data onto it, and it can be measured lineal in time and transfer speeds, ie: 90% freespace = 90% of its capable performance, 50% freespace = 50% of its capable performance, 25% freespace = 25% of its capable performance. In both search time and transfer speeds.

I have to say that sounds highly exaggerated to me (excpet for search time, which will logically increase as the volume of searched data increases).

Others that have worked in I.T may have their own opinion ...

I guess that would be me; but I see concurrent ideas when I search online - things that mostly say HDD performance will drop when used space nears its limit, but only with around a 10% penalty.

Of course disk fragmentation can play a role no matter what the capacity, so a defragging routine - preferably one that works automatically - is important.
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