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SynJohn View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote SynJohn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 May 2021 at 23:05
Originally posted by angora angora wrote:


Great series of nature at work.
I know this might upset some but your dog is welcome in our area any time. Over $20,000 in 2 years of landscape damage from a recent surge in rabbits. All are invasive to this area so we have open hunt too knock the populataion down.

Edited by Micholand - 27 May 2021 at 17:48
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Phil Wood View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Phil Wood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2021 at 00:30
Black sheep.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote angora Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2021 at 11:34
beautiful sheep! (s)he draws lots of attention! ;)

ma looks great, Dirk! not familiar with this breed, really like the slender appearance!
(which province are you in?).

Originally posted by Dirk Dirk wrote:

BTW I live in the countryside, and our dogs regularly chase wild hares, which are very common and numerous here. While the dogs are in very good condition, the manage to catch a hare every now and then. They bring it home and eat all of it. That's nature IMO.

Originally posted by SynJohn SynJohn wrote:

Great series of nature at work.
I know this might upset some but your dog is welcome in our area any time. Over $20,000 in 2 years of landscape damage from a recent surge in rabbits. All are invasive to this area so we have open hunt too knock the populataion down.

TY, Dirk and John! (late response! last 2 days unexpectedly turned out to be working days, in the neighbour's garden). of course I understand what you are both saying. my story was about 'side-effects' that can occur when teaching dogs that stuffed toys belong to them. esp. when a dog is larger and out of control, when 'obeying' is not among its best developed skills. neighbourhood pets will not be safe and nor will little children, carrying a toy around.

+ (as a rabbit's advocate ;)) a bottom line that domestic rabbits have no place in 'nature'. (when the happy few, lucky/brave/strong enough to survive, start to multiply, wild coloured coats will have returned by the 5th generation, but there are other significant differences, due to 500+ years of domestication. rabbit adapted, even the intestines are about half a meter shorter and so on).

Max is not my dog (TG , although I like to believe I could teach him manners very quickly ;)). but he is my friend and he shows it by jumping into my arms (did I mention he weighs 57 kilograms?), trying to sit on my lap, nm if I'm sitting on a scooter or other 'impossible' places, becoming a stumbling block by falling onto his back all of a sudden and other tokens of his friendship.
he has no hunting genes, other than jumping into people's picknick baskets, cars, vans, campers and even houses, to catch food. (habit! his human often complains about the lack of understanding people have, and that they are 'so' easily pissed off ). in this case there was no chasing, he just picked it up. the rabbit was either weakened and pres. 'frozen' or trapped. we were practically standing beside that bush.


@John- sorry to 'hear' that rabbits are thriving in your area. when nature takes its course however, it 'normally' will take care of overpopulation by launching a disease of some sort, to restore the balance. given that every species has its place, thus needs, 'deserves' a place to live?
(here, in densely populated Holland for instance, a rural area was turned into a residential quarter and people were complaining that brown rats were invading their outside spaces. while actually it was the other way round? or, thanks to a strong lobby of birders, an area was turned into whatlookedlike a mud pool, to lure the migratory birds that pass over. the geese loved it! they loved it so much, that the province decided to shoot the geese. ? ). the US pres. have enough room for all, but for some undefined reason things seem to change when man starts to interfere, to redesign nature?

in the case of wild rabbits the incredible happened.
it started with a man-made virus, named VHD/RHD (rabbit viral haemorrhagic disease). an incredibly fast acting nasty killer.
rumour has it, it was stolen from a lab and spread by a N.-Z. farmer in the early 90s. extremely contagious, even through air, it killed gazillions of rabbits. but whether you decide to breed dinos or design viruses, nature will always find a way? during the years that followed the deadly virus adapted, changed and became less lethal. in 2015 new variant RHD2 was spread. the latest?

in the coastal area -here-, the burrowing of rabbits can be hazardous to the dunes, that are supposed to protect us. but the new virus worked like a charm. the less wild rabbits remained, the more the landscape, the entire eco-system, started to change. plants vanished, making room for non-native, invasive plants and many of the -other- animals/birds/insects vanished. the same vegetation effects have been reported in the UK and in Spain (rare) predators are on the verge of extinction, all depending heavily on rabbits. in a way that scientists are sounding the alarm. saying the effects are so disasterous and alarming, they strongly advice to find ways to reintroduce wild rabbits.

or, 'scientifically':
< Rabbit activity, including grazing, burrowing, trampling and dunging, are all important factors in the maintenance of the habitat and its heterogeneity. Rabbit populations were almost entirely wiped out by the widespread introduction of the myxomatosis virus in the 1950s. This was followed by changes to the vegetation (Ranwell 1963) and an explosive growth of scrub on many sites. From the 1990s the rabbit populations have also been affected by the Rabbit Viral Haemorrhagic Disease (RHVD). During the last 150 years on the Dutch and German Frisian Islands there have been cyclic changes in population density due to changes in hunting intensity and diseases such as myxomatosis and RHVD (Drees 2004). In 1990 the population on the Frisian Islands collapsed and since 2003 the population has stabilised at a lower level (Drees 2007).

The loss of rabbits from the dune systems of north west Europe has led to a decrease in the small-scale dynamics of the grey dunes (van Til and Kooijman 2007). Species richness is highest at intermediate levels of rabbit pressure (Zeevalking and Fresco 1977, Isermann et al., submitted). This grazing activity induces spatial heterogeneity and maintains succession stages with high numbers of species (Gibson 1988).
It is rabbits, therefore, which have an indispensable role to play in the recovery of such dunes. >

(from: https://ec.europa.eu/environment/nature/natura2000/management/habitats/pdf/2130_Fixed_coastal_dunes.pdf )

sorry??? -long story about ...dogs -
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Dirk View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dirk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2021 at 13:22
Thanks, i was unaware of that problem. I live in the Hoeksche Waard, no or luttele rabits here in theceestern part where I live. Lots of hares, they thrive here.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote SynJohn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2021 at 16:43
I do understand your point of view on the rabbits. What we have here is little brown rabbits that are destroying habitat for all of the native critters we have fostered in our yards. My wife and I spent 25 years building a 1/2 acre low maintenance no grass yard to conserve water. We had 12 Lace-leaf (Japanese) maples that took over 20 years to grow destroyed in only a week due to them coming in and eating the bark. They have also eaten all of the flowering plants in the yard that used to harbor and feed many hummingbirds, Junkos, quail and other birds that thrived in our yard.
These are not your little pretty plushy toy look a likes. S o now we have lost at least 8 species not counting the coyotes that would feed in the yard as part of natural selection.

We do have 2 dogs that do not kill anything either although they are more than agile enough to do so.

Sorry for the rant
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Phil Wood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 May 2021 at 15:21
Originally posted by angora angora wrote:

beautiful sheep! (s)he draws lots of attention! ;)

It's a he. Occasionally he will pay the sheep enough attention for a quick greeting (nose to nose through the fence), but he's usually more interested in destroying a stick (as in the pic). The sheep are amazingly dog friendly, presumably due to spending a lot of time in this field alongside a popular dog walking path.

A couple of days ago we went for a walk with friends who have expressed the desire for a picture of their mutt (another he) on the move (they have already had professional dog portrait sessions). I usually forget this and turn up with a far too wide lens. On this occasion I forgot again, but happened to have a beercan with me.

Dougie:

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dirk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 May 2021 at 22:12
Handsome dog Phil, clearly having fun!
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Post Options Post Options   Quote angora Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 June 2021 at 12:15
wonderful, Phil!

@Dirk- Hoeksche Waard sounds good! paradise in the vicinity of all facilities. not far from here. (waving at you from Zeeland, Walcheren to be precize ).

Originally posted by SynJohn SynJohn wrote:

I do understand your point of view on the rabbits. What we have here is little brown rabbits that are destroying habitat for all of the native critters we have fostered in our yards. My wife and I spent 25 years building a 1/2 acre low maintenance no grass yard to conserve water. We had 12 Lace-leaf (Japanese) maples that took over 20 years to grow destroyed in only a week due to them coming in and eating the bark. They have also eaten all of the flowering plants in the yard that used to harbor and feed many hummingbirds, Junkos, quail and other birds that thrived in our yard.
These are not your little pretty plushy toy look a likes. S o now we have lost at least 8 species not counting the coyotes that would feed in the yard as part of natural selection.

We do have 2 dogs that do not kill anything either although they are more than agile enough to do so.

Sorry for the rant

rants ideally should bring some relief, truly sorry it won't solve a thing in this case. and very sorry to 'hear' about the damage!! are the trees really beyond salvation? as you say: native critters. are they? are those cottontails? natives? don't they have enemies?

only familiar with 'our' (European) rabbits, our own breed (you'll never guess what it is? ) in particular, but in general:
rabbits are basically 'twilight animals', breakfast/dinner is at dawn and dusk (thus the times to pay attention?). goes for domesticated rabbits as well, but unlike their domesticated counterparts, those are the times they, for obvious reasons, eat as much as they can (hence the longer intestines). what could scare them off, -apart from barriers, never seen them climb-, is smell. the smell of predators, humans included. unfortunally volatile, it won't last very long? (actually, I used to say that to people calling what they could do against foxes sneaking around, but ..... ;)). theoretically, you could chase them away with your dirty laundry ;), when you stop using indoor plumbing and there are people who collect hair from local hairdressers, to spread around. or the presence of-/encounters with dogs??

get to know your rabbits and you'd be able to come up with ideas? btw- rabbits and horses have lots in common! 1st of all they are animals of prey. on top are 2 huge radars, sounds are important. they can't afford to check things out, at first they'll flee. they 'see' with their noses! the -bulging- eyes are at the sides of their heads, providing wide-angle view and often they sit up to look around, but they can't see what's right in front of them. i.e. smell is most important. the ultimate warning signal -to others or out of fear- is thumping. every rabbit understands what it means when you stomp your foot repeatedly, danger!
perhaps things that make strange noises, squeak, hiss, rattle, the odd -inflated?- plastic bag (famous for startling horses) tied to branches, could help too?
(our own rabbits didn't blink when bombs (i.e. 'modern' fireworks) exploded, but try using a tiny little piece of sanding paper, that makes squeaking noises, and our buck Junior would be glued to the ceiling. same with hissing sounds, while trying to inflate their beach ball(s). not all were as easily spooked, but outside the comfort of their home, everything changes? it's the unknown, potential danger, that startles them. still- the way to calm a freightened rabbit, is to (hold it and) cover their eyes, when it gets (as) dark (as a rabbit hole)).

rabbits may be cautious, but by no means cowards and they do need to eat. (they'll be back? IF it's not too convincingly 'dangerous').
although they like to nibble, (food/grass/hay/straw to prevent their teeth from growing), bark is not their favourite dish? sounds like sheer desperation in winter and severe shortage of food? can't you provide/sow some food somewhere away from your yard? and far, far away?
wild animals can do the strangest things for the strangest reasons. pheasants are known to peck holes in potatoes, when they -only- need moist, and can't find water. for instance? and the same often goes for rabbits/hares. easy to solve, thus to keep crops (merely ;)) intact?

I, for one, also made a 'career' in organic farming, as a farm hand/'workhorse'. ;) and thus watched the crops and the 'damage' for many years. nets are important to protect the young juicy plants, (esp. from birds! butterflies!), until they start growing. but prior to nets, there was always enough left? at the end of the fields, near undergrowth/shelter, you'll find pumpkin peels with teeth marks, mostly superficial, you'll find outer leaves with holes in them and sometimes a, 1, small pumpkin entirely hollowed out by rats. never seen horror rabbits or -hares eating everything. in a rural environment, in spring/summer/autumn. in winter things change, even deer on a cabbage field.

in organic farming, hertshoorn olie / hartshorn oil (google keeps changing it into hawthorn :S) is often placed in between crops, in small tubes on sticks. the smell is known to chase everything away (including me :)). also known as repellent is neem oil (and -trees). (never seen it used though. only know that azadirachta indica is a miraculous tree).
+ other recipes ?
hope the trees and other plants will recover and that you'll be able to keep the yard to yourselves!

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Post Options Post Options   Quote bigsi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 June 2021 at 08:15
Baz, one of my customers dogs-

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dirk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 June 2021 at 12:34
Originally posted by bigsi bigsi wrote:

Baz, one of my customers dogs-
[/IMG][/URL]

Nice framing! Love it
"The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera" - Dorothea Lang
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Post Options Post Options   Quote bigsi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 June 2021 at 23:44
Originally posted by Dirk Dirk wrote:

Originally posted by bigsi bigsi wrote:

Baz, one of my customers dogs-
[/IMG][/URL]

Nice framing! Love it


Thanks Dirk!
You win or you learn....
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Post Options Post Options   Quote bonneville Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 June 2021 at 17:28
Not my dogs this time, all taken at a recent Pet Studio Photo Workshop with Sony a7iii + FE 24-70 f4 with triggered studio lights:
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Post Options Post Options   Quote pegelli Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 June 2021 at 10:25
Nice work Brian, especially the look in the eyes of the last one is priceless "can I have that nibble pleeeeease"
You can see the April Foolishness 2021 exhibition here Another great show of the talent we have on Dyxum
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Post Options Post Options   Quote fennetje Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 June 2021 at 21:23
light rain

A7II + minolta 58 1.4

evening dress

A99II + minolta 135 2.8 AF
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