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Minolta 75-300 D vs Sony 70-300 G2

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moineau View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote moineau Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Minolta 75-300 D vs Sony 70-300 G2
    Posted: 15 January 2019 at 23:47
Good day
My first post here.
I bought a Sony a 77ii. As a Tele-zoom I use a Minolta 75-300 D from my time with the XD-s. I have the impression of unsharpness with longer focal-length. Now I am thinking about buying the Sony 70-300G2, a newer lens, made for digital cameras. The price is hefty, but I would spend it for sharper pictures.
I would use it for airplane and bird spotting.
Is there anybody who has used both lenses and can give his findings on the quality-difference?

Good light for everyone.
John
 



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QuietOC View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote QuietOC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 January 2019 at 02:32
Some 70-300G2's will be less sharp than some 75-300D's. I have a sharp 75-300D. I had a sharp 70-300G2. Neither is as sharp as my DT 55-300 SAM or my Big Beercan. Your experience will vary.

The 70-300G's lose focal length at close focus--more of an issue for insects than birds or planes. I used the 70-300G2 for one event and didn't notice any focus improvement over the 55-300. I did notice its greater mass and reduced focal range.

The 70-300G's have a flatter focus plane and a bit less chromatic aberration. The 75-300's are more prone to purple fringing.

The Minolta 100-400 F4.5-6.7 APO is another option. I don't think my copy is worth using over my 55-300, but it is fairly light and pretty decent. I've used my Sigma 600 F8 for plane spotting. 300 mm is petty short, and 400 mm is not much longer. One of Tamron 150-600's may be a better choice.

Edited by QuietOC - 16 January 2019 at 17:27
A68 30M 35 50 60M 16-50 16-80 18-55 18-70 18-135 55-200 55-300
A6000 LA-EA1 6.5 16 20 30 50 60 16-50 18-55 55-210
600si: 20 24 28 50 100M 135 24-85 24-105 28-105 35-70 35-105 70-210 75-300 100-200
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LAbernethy View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote LAbernethy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 January 2019 at 04:48
welcome aboard moineau.
The Minolta 75-300 D is a budget screw drive lens prone to chromatic aberration.
The Sony 70-300G2 is a premium , high-torque SSM (Super Sonic Wave Motor), Moisture and Dust-Resistant, high-quality piece of engineering and is worth the upgrade. If the price tag on the G2 bothers you there are plenty of reasonably priced G1s on the pre-owned market.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote addy landzaat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 January 2019 at 07:41
I doubt that 75-300 lens was used on an XD-s as that camera had a different lens mount

I think most is said. The 70-300g and 70-300g2 are better lenses, how much better depends on your copy of the lenses. Also take a look at the Tamron 70-300 USD and the Minolta 100-300 APO. And like QuietOC says, you might also look at something longer.

I use a Minolta 100-300APO as a small option and a Sony 70-400G for image quality. I am happy with these, but the 100-300APO is a bit limited on APS-C.

It is not easy to find a lens that fits your needs.
Why not follow me on Instagram? @Addy_101
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sybersitizen View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote sybersitizen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 January 2019 at 16:49
Originally posted by moineau moineau wrote:

I am thinking about buying the Sony 70-300G2, a newer lens, made for digital cameras. The price is hefty, but I would spend it for sharper pictures.

It's very likely that the much less expensive Sony 55-300mm will give you equally sharp pictures. It might be a little slower to focus than the 70-300, but it's quite a good lens.
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Miranda F View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Miranda F Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 January 2019 at 11:14
I agree with what's been said. The Min 75-300 is a good film lens but not up to pixel-peeping on digital. The 100-300mm APO is a very good lens for its age (I like it) but I'd still go with a modern one if you are fussy.
Miranda F & Sensorex, Sony A58, 5d, Dynax 4, 5, 60, 500si/600si/700si/800si, various Sony & Minolta lenses, several Tamrons, lots of MF primes and *far* too many old film cameras . . .
 



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Bob J View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Bob J Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 January 2019 at 13:14
One of my first lenses was the 75-300D, it is a decent enough lens, but does not get near the 7-300G (I have the first version).

A valid alternative which is certainly more compact that the G is the 100-300 APO, which can be found for quite reasonable money - however, make sure you get an APO... there is an earlier non-APO which is not as good. There are two versions of the APO - the APO and the APO D... main differences are the extra contacts and the fitting of the lens hood.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote macronut Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 January 2019 at 13:48
All valid points. Well said members!

If you take the plunge on that 300 G2, you might consider a used 70-400 G1 for about the same money. For me personally, 300mm isnt long enough for birding and the like. If money is not so limiting, and you donít mind a big lens, tamronís new 150- 600mm version two is a revelation.

The Minolta 100-300 APO D can be bought for about $125-$200 on any given day. Readily available and cheap. What I love about it is how small it is. Itís about the size of a 100mm prime. Itís not a low light lens, nor tack sharp. But in its price range nothing is tack sharp. It is a good consumer grade lens. Optically Itís better than what you are using now. Build quality is about the same. I typically recommend it when these conversations about 300mm zooms come up.

The Tamron 70-300mm USD is another obvious choice when looking to improve your situation without breaking the bank, and is always mentioned. Pretty decent sharpness and build quality. Focusing speed is a tad slow.

Perhaps what would best satisfy you would be the Sony 70-300mm G original version. Itís only selling for around $350-$500 And should retain most of that value if you decide itís not for you. But your post did mention willingness to spend on the G2 version. Thatís for you to decide. I personally have a hard time spending that kind of money to only shoot out to 300mm.

No conversation about 300mm zooms would be complete without mentioning the 100-300mm zooms made by tokina and sigma. All versions have excellent sharpness. The problems seems to be digital cameras stripping the focusing gears on the sigmas and the first version tokina (red ring). This problem doesnít exist in the version 2 (gold ring). A few of us here own this lens, myself included. Simply put, itís awesome. You can find them on eBay often, but sadly not often in A-mount. It may take you a year or more to find one. You could try asking a Japanese seller to locate one for you. This lens is all metal. Itís built to last. Itís heavy when compared to other 300mm zooms. Thatís really the only complaint. I canít find fault in images taken with mine.   Expect to pay $350-$550. Typically sellers know itís rare in A-mount, and subsequently it sells for more than the Nikon mount.

Edited by macronut - 18 January 2019 at 13:51
Only from the mind of Macronut.
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TomV View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote TomV Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 January 2019 at 15:43
I had the Sony 55-300 on my a65. A very nice lens but not fast enough AF for birding.
I upgraded to the 70-400 and was impressed with the IQ and the AF speed for a zoom, especially since it has focus limiting on the low end.

I had moved up to Minolta primes (400 and 600). However, I was less than impressed with the purple fringing, especially the 600. Both are very sharp and also have focus limiting, both on the short and long end, but not both ends simultaneously. I have tested the Minolta 300 and it too has more purple fringing. I would think the Minolta zooms are no better for this parameter.

I tested a Sigma 500 EX and was very impressed with the lack of purple fringing. I sold both Minoltas as a result. The only thing lacking is the focus limiting, but I can use my a99ii function for reasonable performance.

I also purchased the 70-300 G2 (since I could) and like it because of the lighter weight and smaller bulk of the 70-400. It also has focus limiting on the low end. More of a walk-around lens for me.

I highly recommend the Sony 70-300 over other brands because of:
1) Focus limiting
2) Can use all of the fancy focusing modes the Sony body offers
3) Lens correction for jpegs
4) Full-frame vrs cropped Sony 55-300
5) Minoltas are typically 20 years older than the Sony
6) The most recent and best Minolta in this range, Minolta AF 100-300mm F4.5-5.6 D APO, is not rated as well for sharpness wide open or beyond 250mm.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote mirthseeker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 January 2019 at 23:29
Originally posted by macronut macronut wrote:

All valid points. Well said members!

If you take the plunge on that 300 G2, you might consider a used 70-400 G1 for about the same money. For me personally, 300mm isnt long enough for birding and the like. If money is not so limiting, and you donít mind a big lens, tamronís new 150- 600mm version two is a revelation.

The Minolta 100-300 APO D can be bought for about $125-$200 on any given day. Readily available and cheap. What I love about it is how small it is. Itís about the size of a 100mm prime. Itís not a low light lens, nor tack sharp. But in its price range nothing is tack sharp. It is a good consumer grade lens. Optically Itís better than what you are using now. Build quality is about the same. I typically recommend it when these conversations about 300mm zooms come up.

The Tamron 70-300mm USD is another obvious choice when looking to improve your situation without breaking the bank, and is always mentioned. Pretty decent sharpness and build quality. Focusing speed is a tad slow.

Perhaps what would best satisfy you would be the Sony 70-300mm G original version. Itís only selling for around $350-$500 And should retain most of that value if you decide itís not for you. But your post did mention willingness to spend on the G2 version. Thatís for you to decide. I personally have a hard time spending that kind of money to only shoot out to 300mm.

No conversation about 300mm zooms would be complete without mentioning the 100-300mm zooms made by tokina and sigma. All versions have excellent sharpness. The problems seems to be digital cameras stripping the focusing gears on the sigmas and the first version tokina (red ring). This problem doesnít exist in the version 2 (gold ring). A few of us here own this lens, myself included. Simply put, itís awesome. You can find them on eBay often, but sadly not often in A-mount. It may take you a year or more to find one. You could try asking a Japanese seller to locate one for you. This lens is all metal. Itís built to last. Itís heavy when compared to other 300mm zooms. Thatís really the only complaint. I canít find fault in images taken with mine.   Expect to pay $350-$550. Typically sellers know itís rare in A-mount, and subsequently it sells for more than the Nikon mount.

I Agree absolutely. Would only add that the Minolta 100-300 APO (non-D) is the same optically as the D, although it hoes not have the circular aperture. The first version of the Tamron 150-600 might be a possibility. Definitely agree about the Tokina 100-300 f/4 from personal experience, the only issue is finding one (the Sigma might be an option - no experience of that one). And the Sony 70-400 comes into play as well.
Edit: The Sigma 150-500 might be a possibility too. Have a search for @SnowFella's birding pics - I am impressed with the results he shows using that on his A77.

Edited by mirthseeker - 25 January 2019 at 00:02
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Post Options Post Options   Quote moineau Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 January 2019 at 22:59
Thank you all for your contributions.
I checked most of the suggestions, found good pictures.
But I just can't decide.
The 55-300 mm would be good for me, as I would be able to go out with just this lens. But I read critics that hold me back. What is the explanation for the price-difference to the 70-300 G2. Is this lens 3 times better? If the IQ is really better I would certainly opt for the latter.
For the Miolra 100-300 APO I found very pleasing pictures, but with this I wuld lack the space between 70 to 100 mm.

I will have to think about it some more.....

John
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Post Options Post Options   Quote mirthseeker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 January 2019 at 00:40
Check out Kurt Munger's reviews of the 55-300 and version 1 of the 70-300 G (the G2 would test similarly). The descriptions of each lens will tell you why they are priced so differently, and while he used an A77 testing the 55-300 and an A700 with the 70-300G, he does provide consistency in his testing methods - which our database tests don't.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote LAbernethy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 January 2019 at 04:12
Originally posted by mirthseeker mirthseeker wrote:

Check out Kurt Munger's reviews of the 55-300 and version 1 of the 70-300 G (the G2 would test similarly). The descriptions of each lens will tell you why they are priced so differently, and while he used an A77 testing the 55-300 and an A700 with the 70-300G, he does provide consistency in his testing methods - which our database tests don't.

I have had the same Sony 55-300 and 70-300 G on a 7D, A100, A700, A300, A500, A580, A850, A37, A57 and A77; and I can tell you that "mileage will vary" depending on what they're mounted on.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote LAbernethy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 January 2019 at 04:27
Originally posted by moineau moineau wrote:


What is the explanation for the price-difference to the 70-300 G2. Is this lens 3 times better? I will have to think about it some more.....

John


dust and moisture sealing. No it is not 3 times better unless you are doing a shoot in a desert when a freak rain storm hits; then it's a hundred times better.
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