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Ransomware for DSLRs

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Pallanza View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Pallanza Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Ransomware for DSLRs
    Posted: 13 August 2019 at 14:02
At DEFCON 27, a researcher demonstated hacking a Canon EOS80D (see here and here). Canon did react (see here).

The technical background are some weaknesses in the firmware of the camera and in the protocol used for transfering images by WiFi or bluethooth. heise.de states for other camera brands, that by now the only way to avoid ransomware attacs is, to disable WiFi and bluetooth in the camera.

Does somebody know something about related problems with Sony cameras?
 



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Snegren View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Snegren Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 August 2019 at 14:26
I suppose Sony will have the same vulnerabilities. But this is just theory, your camera is the proverbial needle in the haystack. Safety by numbers.
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Bob J View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Bob J Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 August 2019 at 18:01
What isn't clear is whether the malicious code can actually alter the firmware (I would imagine not), so the encryption might just affect the cards that were in the camera at the time (a loss, but not a non-functioning camera), with the camera returning to normal operation after power-down...

...in truth we just don't know as yet, but I would not imagine that Sony were immune..
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Post Options Post Options   Quote jkp1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 August 2019 at 18:33
But what happens when you dump the card on your computer ?
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Pallanza View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Pallanza Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 August 2019 at 20:22
The firmware has been infected. The researcher has been able to implement additional firmware on the camera. Thus he could encode/encrypt images on the SD-card.

Well, and if the images have been encrypted, your computer will have some problems when reading then.

So I am pretty happy for having selected the flight modus on my cameras by default. This saves battery too.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote minolta_mutley Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 August 2019 at 20:31
I assume Sony due to it's usage of Android 'll be vulnerable to bugs too. The firmware is updated by software, so parts of it - the bootloader can be replaced by malware loading firmware. It's linux based, and it can be done. Even small parts (blocks) can be written.

So all my camera's will stay in airplane mode. But even then with a usb-connection it can also be hacked. It may be hackable thru the sd-card slot too - more difficult - but still it can probably exist.

It won't stop all nasty stuff (what spreads thru sd-cards will be more difficult to stop - even when i am using linux in 99.95% of all times to download my images) - but it saves at least some battery power.

It's only in a lab now - but it may become reality in a nearer future. Is this market worth it? Maybe for encryptor-malware.

Isn't the smartphone-market more attractive - certainly in numbers.

I'm fond of protection by biometrics (not at all - you cannot replace a password by something that can be photographed by most of us with top-sensors and top glass isn't that nice? - the CCC gave in the past two demo's and still it's treated as the holy security grail by the marketeers).   

Security is more than camera's alone it's the complete environment that needs to be under control - by the user (not by the company that sells/creates software/hardware).
 



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Post Options Post Options   Quote beautiophile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 August 2019 at 03:12
Originally posted by minolta_mutley minolta_mutley wrote:

I assume Sony due to it's usage of Android 'll be vulnerable to bugs too. The firmware is updated by software, so parts of it - the bootloader can be replaced by malware loading firmware. It's linux based, and it can be done. Even small parts (blocks) can be written.
Sony knows how to control DRM with hardware to prevent the violation of stock bootloader. They do it well in their Xperia phones. Still, it can be bypassed, but difficult.
It's only in a lab now - but it may become reality in a nearer future. Is this market worth it? Maybe for encryptor-malware.
Product values and profit margins are usually higher in small markets.
Isn't the smartphone-market more attractive - certainly in numbers.
Remember the case of Jennifer Lawrence's iCloud? A smartphone is always breakable. The reason to do matters to hackers.
Security is more than camera's alone it's the complete environment that needs to be under control - by the user (not by the company that sells/creates software/hardware).
Sadly, the current situation is opposite. You only buy hardware, software belongs to the makers. This has led to the open-source movement.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote minolta_mutley Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 August 2019 at 19:22
I'm running linux, so it is possible - and i'm in full control of my OS. Even DRM can be bypassed - look at the gaming platforms.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote beautiophile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 August 2019 at 02:15
Kudos to linux user. Sorry for off-topic. What raw processor do you have on your linux computer? I tried Darktable but was not satisfied much.
D7D, M7D ~ 16-80ZA
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F20AM, F42AM, F58AM.
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