FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Sharp Flying Birds

Page  <12
Author
Ome Kees View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 02 November 2010
Country: Netherlands
Location: Noord-Holland
Status: Offline
Posts: 335
Post Options Post Options   Quote Ome Kees Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 June 2013 at 08:33
Hi Jon, here is the tip jou are waiting for.
Just set your camera in the sport mode! In this setting your camera will chose the best settings for fast moving objects.
Good luck.
 



Back to Top
Ome Kees View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 02 November 2010
Country: Netherlands
Location: Noord-Holland
Status: Offline
Posts: 335
Post Options Post Options   Quote Ome Kees Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 June 2013 at 15:48
And shoot them upwind, they are a lot slower then.
Minolta semi Maxxum 9000 a9xi Dynax9 a850 X700 SR-1 Autocord Dynax7 XD7 CLE GA645 KW 9x12/6.5x9
Back to Top
JonB View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie

Joined: 19 June 2013
Country: United Kingdom
Location: Bucks
Status: Offline
Posts: 4
Post Options Post Options   Quote JonB Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 June 2013 at 23:32
Thanks again, I'm probably heading out again tomorrow to have another go. I'll let you know if I get anything decent.

I'm probably going to try and swap out my lens for a big beercan if I can find one. I may just have a bad copy of this lens but my patience is really wearing thin with it.
Back to Top
ifreedman View Drop Down
Alpha Eyes group
Alpha Eyes group

Joined: 24 January 2012
Country: United States
Location: Hudson ValleyNY
Status: Offline
Posts: 4766
Post Options Post Options   Quote ifreedman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 June 2013 at 04:12
Hi Jon,

Welcome!!! I think the comments I would have made have mostly been said by others.

Although F/8 would be a good aperture to shoot at (F/18 is unnecessary here), to get higher shutter speeds, you might want to use an aperture even larger... sometimes you lose sharpness at wide apertures, but it's always a tradeoff. Lenses tend to be sharpest at f/5.6 to 8. Larger apertures let in more light and have a smaller depth-of-field, but often at a slight loss of sharpness. After F/8, lenses can suffer from diffraction loss of sharpness. But these loses are often quite minor. I'd base your aperture (f-stop number) on how fast a shutter speed you need and how much depth of field you want. In this case, I think a smaller depth-of-field (larger aperture, like F/5.6) would help to blur the background, so that when you panned, it might have smoothed the background a bit.

Be sure to keep on posting pics. I have an A57. It's a great camera. I'm looking forward to seeing more of your shots.
A77ii, A6000 + various alpha, homemade and adapted lenses
Articles: Tilt-Shift Lenses
Back to Top
hobeck View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie

Joined: 26 April 2013
Country: Norway
Status: Offline
Posts: 12
Post Options Post Options   Quote hobeck Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 June 2013 at 22:59
In my opinion you should start with the the lens wide open, perhaps one or two steps down, set the speed to 1/1000s or more to freeze the movement. Adjust the ISO depending on the light condition.
If shooting against the sky, the light will be brighter and you would have to adjust the aperture to a higher number, and/or also a higher speed
As you learn how this works you can start adjusting the camera settings according to weather/light condition.
After a while you will get the hang of it and enjoy your images, and love to shoot birds in flight.

This is how i started.
Back to Top
Dyxum main page >  Forum Home > Dyxum Photographs > Dyxum Critics Corner Page  <12

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.094 seconds.

Monitor calibration strip

Dyxum.com - Home of the alpha system photographer

In memory of Cameron Hill - brettania

Feel free to contact us if needed.