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Some idle Seascape photography thoughts

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Wētāpunga View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Wētāpunga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Some idle Seascape photography thoughts
    Posted: 14 April 2021 at 03:03
With the closure of much of the forests I usually take waterfall photos in, I've had to develop a good substitute. Fortunately, living on an island means seascapes are a viable alternative. And that process means I've had to learn a few new things.

1. Filters are good I tended not to use filters before because they add another piece of glass for the light to travel through. At a waterfall, you could easily wipe a lens from element dry if necessary. But out on a beach you've got salt spray and sand to deal with. Good protective filters are now a must.

2.Learn to clean a tripod Sand also means tiny bits of grit or wet sand will get into your tripod. Being able to dissemble, clean the parts, and put the tripod back together is a useful skill to have.

3.Take more cleaning gear. One of the essentials now is a blower, as well as some lint-free cloths and a few other bits. Blowing the sand grit out of the tripod head before you fix the base plate is nicer than hearing the grinding noise of grit resisting the clamping device. Likewise keeping the filters clear and clean kind of benefits from a blower more than a cloth.

4.Use tripods with reluctance While for some kinds of shots they are essential, the fact is you often have a lot more light to deal with than say forests, and dodging waves is easier if you don't have to be slowed down with the tripod.

5.Watch the waves The size, force and speed of waves is hard to predict. In many of the more interesting spots to photograph, they're even a bit dangerous.

6.Foreground interest matters It matters a lot. What makes a marvellous tourist beach with long expanses of sand and a calm swimming beach, can make for a dull photo. You need extra elements in the photo.
a7riii- Voigtländer 15/4.5, 110/2.5 M; Zeiss Loxia- 21/2.8, 35/2, 50/2 & 85/2.4, Zeiss Batis- 85/1.8 & 135/2.8; Sony 24-105/4 G; Sigma 70/2.8 M; Tamron 150-500 f5-6.7; Sony SAL 135/2.8 STF
 



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angora View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote angora Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 April 2021 at 12:22
Thank You, B.! appreciated!

(couldn't agree more on the filter advice and assume you'll have to deal with a high-surf / huge splashes -in that gorgeous wonderland of yours - on a -more- regular base.
wouldn't know what's worse- sand or seawater. all I know is that they are both lethal to cameras, harzardous to lenses.

living on a(n) (former) island as well- I've dreaming of sea pics for years and still didn't happen. (apart from birds catching -seafood- lunch and the like). pics through ND filters and pics with a lot of FG interest- like enormous crabs and starfish. meaning having to go really low, near the waterline. with a tripod that's capable of going low. we also have these venomous weeverfish that bury themselves in the wet! sand and I'd like to find one. as well as the sea anemones that lived in between the basalt rocks throughout my childhood).

about tripods- watched a webinar by ijsvogel/Gustav recently and he came up with a 'tripod-hack', tired of seeing the legs of his tripod sink into the sand all the time, while shooting seals from a low POV. (the burden of having to use these massive cannon-like lenses of his? ). he attached the upper half of a tripod to a frying pan with a screw and has been a happy camper since. ;)

+ my 1/2 cent- make sure to bring enough cloths or ? to clean you hands with. and plastic bags or ? to stow used ones away, as you don't want them in your camera bag. even if you manage to keep the gear clean, it doesn't take much to find yourself covered in sand. wiping sand off a bag, tripod or picking up / repositioning something like a shell will be enough.

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Wētāpunga View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Wētāpunga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 April 2021 at 23:47
Originally posted by angora angora wrote:

...

+ my 1/2 cent- make sure to bring enough cloths or ? to clean you hands with. and plastic bags or ? to stow used ones away, as you don't want them in your camera bag. even if you manage to keep the gear clean, it doesn't take much to find yourself covered in sand. wiping sand off a bag, tripod or picking up / repositioning something like a shell will be enough.



Thanks- yes, this is also good advice. A small microfibre towel is very handy. And any system where you can take photos without putting anything down on the sand is smart. So I like sling bags I can swing around to the front, or good sized messenger bags that gives easy access to the gear.

At some locations the sea spray and sand is a big problem for me, so managing that risk is important.
a7riii- Voigtländer 15/4.5, 110/2.5 M; Zeiss Loxia- 21/2.8, 35/2, 50/2 & 85/2.4, Zeiss Batis- 85/1.8 & 135/2.8; Sony 24-105/4 G; Sigma 70/2.8 M; Tamron 150-500 f5-6.7; Sony SAL 135/2.8 STF
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