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Sony a200

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Ovrwrkd71 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Ovrwrkd71 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Sony a200
    Posted: 21 March 2019 at 12:58
Iím as new as it gets to photography. I purchased a Sony A200ís. what makes or types of lenses can I use on it. I ha e the original lenses that came with it I believe 30-70mm and 70-300. Neither are very good for portraits or wide angle shots. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Please remember to dumb it down for me.

Thank you
 



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Aavo View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Aavo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2019 at 13:27
Welcome to Dyxum!
You can mount all A-mount in-body AF-drive lenses made by Minolta, Sony, Sigma, Tamron, Tokina and so on. As you have aps-c sensor, aps-c lenses are smaller and lighter.
Please find our lenses database.

Edited by Aavo - 21 March 2019 at 13:52
a6500 & some nice e-mount lenses. Be fond of photography - this is the way to alleviate stress
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Stuart1701 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Stuart1701 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2019 at 13:28
Welcome!
The A200 uses the A mount - originaly manufactured by Minolta, then taken over by Sony. There is a comprehensive list of available lenses, with user reviews on this website - look under lenses.

The sensor in your camera is APS-C (smaller sensor) so those lenses are best to use, although full frame will work also. You can select which or all to search for in the database.

Lenses for the A mount were made by several manufacturers, and there are a number of good quality old film lenses out there which will still work very well on your A200.

Hope this helps.
Stuart M.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote waldo_posth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2019 at 13:29
Welcome to Dyxum!

The Sony A200 had a 18-70mm kit lens. 18mm is a wide angle focal length which corresponds a 28mm wide angle in full format (talking about focal lengths contains usually a reference to "full format" - the most widely used format originating in the film days - from 135 film). The a200 has a "crop-sensor" (or more exactly: APS-C sensor - because there are even smaller sensor) which is smaller than full format with the effect that the focal lenghts have to be multiplied by the "crop-factor", in this case 1,5 to know what full format focal lengths are corresponding with them. A typical wide angle zoom might have a focal length from 10-20mm (i.e. 15-30mm full format or FF).
The 70-300mm is a telezoom. I am not sure whether the A200 came bundled with one of them originally. I think rather not. There are many of them (Minolta, Sony, Sigma and Tamron are the most reputable).

Generally, for portrait shootings a (FF) focal length of 85-100mm is usually seen as most convenient (the longer the focal length the more distance between camera and portrayed person in the studio is needed). With an APS-C crop sensor this would mean 55-70mm. That's the long end of your kit lens or the short end of your telezoom.

Best solution for potraits is, of course, a fast prime lens (i.e. a lens with a fixed focal length) that allows you to to lift the portrayed person out of a blurred background. A Minolta/Sony AF F/1.4 50mm lens might be the most inexpensive solution to do that.

The Sony A200's lens bayonet is called A-mount. Use the DYXUM lens database to find out more about available lenses. Recently Minolta AF lenses (which introduced the A-mount) have become very inexpensive. They have all been designed for full format, however - so you will not find any decent wide angle lenses for Sony APS-C cameras among them. Wide angle zooms for APS-C by Sigma, Tamron and Tokina might in this case be the solution.
"Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You are not here long." (Walker Evans)   http://www.flickr.com/photos/waldo_posth/
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Post Options Post Options   Quote QuietOC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2019 at 15:54
Originally posted by Ovrwrkd71 Ovrwrkd71 wrote:

Iím as new as it gets to photography. I purchased a Sony A200ís. what makes or types of lenses can I use on it. I ha e the original lenses that came with it I believe 30-70mm and 70-300. Neither are very good for portraits or wide angle shots. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

A-mount lenses can be found very inexpensively used, sometimes even refurbished or new.

Most affordable APS-C portrait lenses:

Minolta 50mm F1.7
Minolta 35-105mm F3.5-4.5
Minolta 70-210mm F4

The Sony DT lenses are mostly better. The Sony DT 50mm F1.8 SAM is often sharper than the Minolta. The wider Sony DT 35mm F1.8 SAM is nice to have too. The Sony 85 F2.8 SAM is also good.

The Sigma 50-150mm F2.8 EX DC HSM is nice if you want a better portrait zoom. It is smaller than the x-200mm F2.8 zooms. The Sony DT 55-200 SAM is a smaller/lighter alternative to the Minolta zooms above.

The Sony DT 16-50mm F2.8 SSM is best I've found for wide angle shots. If you don't mind trying manual focus the Samyang 16 F2 is good.

Edited by QuietOC - 21 March 2019 at 18:57
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sybersitizen View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote sybersitizen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2019 at 16:50
Originally posted by Ovrwrkd71 Ovrwrkd71 wrote:

I have the original lenses that came with it I believe 30-70mm and 70-300. Neither are very good for portraits or wide angle shots. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

You need to confirm the exact zoom range of the smaller lens in order get the best advice for a wider angle.

For portraits, consider the Sony 50mm/1.8 (SAL50F18) and Sony 85mm/2.8 (SAL85F28).
 



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mike77 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote mike77 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2019 at 18:02
You probably bought this camera for a good price and should be able to make good use of the gear you have. But before investing in further A-mount lenses you should consider that Sony is no longer actively developing this line of cameras. Newer cameras on which you could use your lenses may never be released by Sony.
A99, NEX-C3, HVL-F43M, more than enough glass (A, E, M42, MD)
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Post Options Post Options   Quote sybersitizen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2019 at 19:04
Originally posted by mike77 mike77 wrote:

... before investing in further A-mount lenses you should consider that Sony is no longer actively developing this line of cameras.

There are a couple dozen very capable existing A-mount models that followed the A200. Many of those would be a dramatic upgrade for the OP without even worrying about future A-mount introductions.

Newer cameras on which you could use your lenses may never be released by Sony.

In addition to all the A-mount cameras, all E-mount cameras can support A-mount lenses with an adapter, and new E-mount cameras will be introduced into the future without any doubt.

The A-mount system is a casual user/bargain hunter's paradise and a great introduction to the world of photography.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote neilt3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2019 at 20:02
Originally posted by mike77 mike77 wrote:

You probably bought this camera for a good price and should be able to make good use of the gear you have. But before investing in further A-mount lenses you should consider that Sony is no longer actively developing this line of cameras. Newer cameras on which you could use your lenses may never be released by Sony.



That's just being pessimistic and negative !
As the O.P is just starting out with an a200 he is guaranteed 11 years of development by Sony on DSLR's and then SLT's .
That's more than enough progress and upgrades available as the O.P's needs and budget , all at a fraction of the price they would be new !

My current main camera is the Sony a900 which came out the same year as the O.P's a200 in 2008 . I bought it used at the end of 2012 for around £800 , now they go for around £450 .
Not interested in the a99 but I'll be getting an a99II at some point .
I started with the a100 when it first came out so I could continue using my Minolta A mount lenses from my film SLR in 2006 , upgraded to the a580 in 2011 , upgraded to the a900 in 2012 and got a used used a77II sometime around 2016 as back up to the a900 as an upgrade to the a580 .

So there's no end to the choice if the a200 doesn't meet his needs at some point .

@ the O.P ;

regarding lenses , I presume the 30-70mm lens is a 35-70mm lens ?
You don't state your budget so it's hard to recomend a lens for your wide angle needs , nor do you say how wide you wan't to go .
To start off with you'll need a lens that starts from around 16-18mm .
A decent low cost lens would be an 18-55mm SAM lens which was the standard kit lens for most of the SLT cameras , more expensive would be such as the Sigma 17-70mm lenses .
Best but dearest might be something like the Sony 16-50mm f/2.8 SSM , or the Sony 18-135mm SAM .

More information is needed to advise better .

For a very wideangle lens you'll need something that starts around 10 or 11mm .

More information on your needs though to help .


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http://www.flickr.com/photos/neilt3/
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Post Options Post Options   Quote mirthseeker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 March 2019 at 01:27
You are right, a 35-70 lens does not provide for wide angle shots.
In order of increasing quality (and price) you might consider:
Sony 18-55 f3.5-5.6 SAM
Sony 18-55 f3.5-5.6 SAM11 (a little better)
Tamron 17-50 f2.8 - the f2.8 aperture will allow you to use it in lower light.
Sony 16-50 f2.8 SSM

Of course, there are others in our database as well. Have a look at the sample images pages, and maybe look at consistent lens reviews on sites like kurtmunger.com too.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote addy landzaat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 March 2019 at 07:27
Welcome to Dyxum, Ovrwrkd71

A lot of relevant information here. A synopsis:

For wide-angle you want a lens that starts at 16, 17 or 18 (of lower) - if you can stretch it the Sony 16-50/2.8 probably is the best one to get. If that one is too expensive, the ones mentioned by mirthseeker are good alternatives.

For portraits you want a lens between 50mm and 90mm with a low f/number. The low f/number is to blur the background ("bokeh"). Zooms like this are expensive, so, a non-zoom lens ("prime") makes sense. I would opt for the Minolta 50/1.7 or the Sony 50/1.8. But the Sony 85/2.8 or Tamron 90/2.8 are also an option.

Hope this helps

MOD EDIT for typo: changed lof f/number to low f/number

Edited by stiuskr - 22 March 2019 at 11:17
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Aavo View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Aavo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 March 2019 at 09:02
Just for remark.

My own experience is, that with aps-c sensor my needs are mostly covered, if I have
1) 1 nice zoom from about 18mm (equivalent to 27mm full frame) up to about 100-150mm (eq to 150-225mm full frame). As A200 has in-body image stabilisation, the max aperture for long end can be up to F5.6 - not much to lose and 1 zoom means you have no need to switch lenses outdoor;
2) 1 fast prime proper for my most needs, acutally at the moment 24mm (eq to 36mm full frame);
3) 1 fast prime for portraits (I have not fast enough at the moment).

So - 1 zoom and 1-2 fast primes with 1 body can be great kit.


a6500 & some nice e-mount lenses. Be fond of photography - this is the way to alleviate stress
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Miranda F Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 March 2019 at 10:54
Welcome!
The real benefit of your camera is the sheer number of good lenses available for it. I can really recommend all the Sony DT lenses - especially the primes, which are small, neat, very good, and quite cheap now. The later zooms are very good too: 18-55, 55-200, and 55-300.
For portraits I would recommend any of the following:
Sony 50mm f1.8 or Minolta f1.7
Sony 85mm f2.8
Sony 55-200mm (this works better for portraits than many other zooms)
All available sub-$100 (US)

Then there are plenty of Minolta zooms, many also cheap, but read the reviews here first - some of them aren't as good as others. QuietOC and I have reviewed most of the lenses you are likely to find at reasonable cost, and we both give plenty of information, plus there are lots of other (less technical) reviews.
Miranda F & Sensorex, Sony A58, 5d, Dynax 4, 5, 60, 500si/600si/700si/800si, various Sony & Minolta lenses, several Tamrons, lots of MF primes and *far* too many old film cameras . . .
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Phil Wood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 March 2019 at 10:17
First point is that there is no 30-70mm lens for the A200 - I would expect you to have the Sony DT 18-70 kit lens? If so you have a reasonably wide lens, but not a particularly good one. If you have the 18-70 what is it you don't like - image quality not good enough, view not wide enough?

When it comes to portraits something in the region of 30-70mm would be a pretty good range on the A200 - again, is it image quality that is lacking? Or focal length, low light performance, etc.?

In terms of recommendations no one has mentioned the Sony DT 18-135 and Sony DT 16-105 - which would cover wide to portrait needs in a single lens. The Sony DT 18-250 or Tamron 16-300 go even longer. None are bargain basement.

However, if money is tight or you simply aren't yet ready to commit heavily to a new hobbby, the inexpensive Sony DT 18-55mm SAM II is a step up from the 18-70, the earlier version (no II) is even cheaper but not quite as good.

If you do have the 18-70 and want to go a lot wider you will need to spend C$250 or more for an ultra-wide zoom that goes out to 10/11/12mm - I have the Sigma 10-20mm f4.5-5.6 which suits my occasional needs for serious width, but I find that the Sony DT 16-50mm is plenty wide enough for most purposes. The 16-50 is an excellent lens, but C$500ish.

The best portrait lenses have wider apertures - f2.8 or bigger (lower f numbers) and are pin sharp with smooth bokeh (out of focus background), or, if you want something really special (and expensive), variable soft focus. The trouble is that most of these are still selling for fairly high prices - hence the recommendations for the cheaper but excellent Sony 85mm f2.8 - if money is no object a Minolta/Sony 85mm f1.4 or a Minolta 100mm f2 would be better (I wish I could justify their expense). The cheapest solution would be a Minolta 50mm f1.7 - but the focal length might be a little short for you - this choice is down to your preference. A zoom avoids that issue - a cheap option would be the Minolta 28-105mm f3.5-4.5 (not the XI version).

I do have a bit of a bias towards the Minolta/Sony lenses but there are decent alternatives from Tamron, Sigma, Tokina etc. So I echo the advice to check out the Dyxum database, reviews and sample images.

Beware, however, some older Sigmas are prone to gear stripping (their plastic gears are overwhelmed by modern AF motor speeds) or cosmetic damage from the Zen coating they used for a while (exterior of the lens gets sticky and needs pretty drastic cleaning). I have a number of Sigma lenses and have not experienced either problem - check all the Dyxum reviews for any specific lens you are interested in, if the problem exists odds are at least one reviewer will say so.

PS I see ebay has a DT 16-105 for sale in Canada for C$250 - not a bad price.
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