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Trekking with DSLR gear

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addy landzaat View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote addy landzaat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Trekking with DSLR gear
    Posted: 27 July 2015 at 07:50
Are you an experienced horseman? If not, just bring the camera with a camera strap. It will be impossible to change lenses on horseback, so, the 135mm will have limited use. I just went with my 17-35 on a A900 (11-23 on APS-C).

If you're an experienced horseman, there are several beltpacks you could use. Something like a Lowepro Inverse 100 or 200 or a ThinkTank Speed Demon might be all you need.

You know that "fanny pack" means something completely different in British English? I guess some of our British friends have a good giggle right now

Anyway, while I was staying at the hotel near Bryce Canyon, we did a horeback trip in a nearby canyon (Bryce is much more expensive, I'm Dutch ), here's a picture:

Sony A900 | Minolta 17-35G | 17mm | f/10 | 1/160s | 160iso
Why not follow me on Instagram? @Addy_101
 



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wetapunga View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote wetapunga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 July 2015 at 06:40
It looks like you may be limited to torso packs or waist packs. I've tried both. Torso is good for easy access, but can get too hot if wearing for lengthy periods outside. Waist packs are better for storing a bit more gear, but you seem to be traveling light. Another useful adjunct is a shirt with two large front pockets to store bits and pieces- like batteries.
a7R, a77ii, QX100 | Minolta 17-35mm G, 20mm, 35-105mm O, 50mm M, 70-210 beercan, 85mm G, 100mm M, 300mm G | Sony 16-50mm, CZ16-80mm, 70-200mm G, 135mm f2.8 STF | Tokina 11-16mm
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photofun View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote photofun Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 July 2015 at 05:19
I am hoping someone can help me. I am going to be horseback riding in Bryce Canyon, Arches and/or Canyonlands. I would like to take my A77II with the Sony 16-50 2.8, and the Minolta 135 Pocket Rocket, and a kenko 1.4 teleconverter.

I have been told by one of the workers at the stable that a backpack is not allowed. In her words, "fanny packs are alright."

Anyone have suggestions on how to manage my gear and have it accessible during the ride?
bmalo
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der dickgg View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote der dickgg Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 October 2013 at 18:39
Long time no message...

There must be many Dyxum-readers that love the outdoors! So leave your comment here.

My gear update: I use nowadays the 24-135mm Sigma, 10-20mm Sigma and a 1.7x teleconverter during hikings. It covers most of my demands.

Last mountain-trekking I had to make the video-shots and also took the NEX-F3 with 19 and 30mm Sigma's and I was very enthusiast about the quality. (And it's light).
Quit a lot of ALPHA gear, a nice collection of Sigma lenses, Dynax and M42 stuff, NEX i.c.w. Sigma's, Gitzo's, Visico's and lots of video-equipment
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Tjeiken View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Tjeiken Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 December 2010 at 09:12
I just went to China for three weeks, hiking some of the time..
I've been hiking for two months on the Camino de Santiago (Spain) as well, and in Norway, by the Naeroy-fjord (and countless of other places)..

I like to keep my hiking gear as light as possible... but i want the great photos as well; so i carry my a100 + my (fairly) new SAL16-105.. all put into a Tamrac Aero Zoom 25 (it _just_ fits in there!)

It can be bought in Denmark here: http://www.befro.dk/shop/tamrac-aero-zoom-10794p.html (located in Aarhus, but they ship as well) Very cheap electronics dealer!

The combination is just perfect for me, as the camerabag can be buckled into the hipbelt of my backpack; in this way i can easily reach the camera, when needed.

On my trip in Spain, i used the a100 and the 18-70 kit lens.. but i find the 16-105 much more useful (perfect reach for traveling)
Sony a77II | SAL1650F2.8 | SAL16105 | SAL35F18 | Minolta 50F1.7 | Minolta 70-210 F4 (BC) | Samyang 8mm | Sigma wide CPL | Metz 58 AF-2 | Curiosity and ingenuity
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der dickgg View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote der dickgg Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 December 2010 at 08:41
I forgot to say that I use a Lowepro Toploader Zoom 50AW bag during these outings in the Alps.... sorry!
Quit a lot of ALPHA gear, a nice collection of Sigma lenses, Dynax and M42 stuff, NEX i.c.w. Sigma's, Gitzo's, Visico's and lots of video-equipment
 



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yannick View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote yannick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 September 2010 at 16:29
Hey,

If it's for a 3 days hike without tent, you could go for an easy single back-pack option, combined with a neoprene camera-case this would give a good option.

There are few solutions from burton, personally I would go for the Zoom 26 L as it's the smallest one. but there are others, and they are very ergonomic. I prefer the burton ones, as they are designed for sports, so the strap system is as known of trekking bags, with hip straps, and wide shoulder straps back cushion etc...

They are made for ski or snowboard tours with shooting, so you have to Improvise and re-invent the compartments.

This would be my way:
Its camera compartment has place for body+lens one Tele and one Prime. I assume that you don't need your charger for 3 days, probably a spare battery.
Its second compartment (normally the shovel compartment) offers enough space for a few pairs of underwear and t-shirts.
And if you take only one flash, you can use the second flash compartment for your raincoat.
that's what I understand under compact packing

Otherwise you could go for the Burton F-Stop pack (it's little bigger)
Or If you go for the Burton Resolution or Focus, you can even bring a 15.4 inch Laptop with you

Edited by yannick - 08 September 2010 at 16:31
A850 | A55 | SAL1855 | 17-35 mm | Beercan | 50mm f1.7 | Sigma 28mm f1.8 | m42 135mm f2.8

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der dickgg View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote der dickgg Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 September 2010 at 15:35
Dear Dyxum-friends,

During mountain trekkings in the winter I use my camera without the VG and only a 18-200mm lens. The build-in flash is usually enough in the mountainhuts. I do realize that this flashlight doesn't give the best effect, the lens is not fast enough for lowlight conditions (f3.5-f6.3), 200mm is not much if a group Ibex or Murmeltieren will be spotted and without the VG I look like an amateur.... but so what?
In summer and autumn I also bring along my 10-20mm for landscape shooting.

In the winterseason when we go camping in the Alps in solitary areas we have to carry a rucksac with tent, sleepingbag, food and so on. The weight is an issue. I also make every year documentary with my small Sony CX 105 AVCHD camera. It doesn't weight that much but when you have to carry also a compleet DSLR-set it's getting to heavy.

Enjoy your trekkings and never (never !!) leave your camera at home! Hope to meet you one day out there!



Edited by der dickgg - 08 September 2010 at 15:45
Quit a lot of ALPHA gear, a nice collection of Sigma lenses, Dynax and M42 stuff, NEX i.c.w. Sigma's, Gitzo's, Visico's and lots of video-equipment
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ChrisH View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ChrisH Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 August 2010 at 11:10
[Maybe some already wrote this]

One of the best solutions I think :
Chest harness + Lowe-'telezoom' with a DSL+lens+some filter+lens cloth and other small stuff ; if you have more lenses put them into your back-pack
or
your packpack has D-rings on the shoulder straps ? --> attach your 'telezoom' with some carabiners to it and put your cam+lens etc in it [a bit more work when you put down your back-pack]

These solotions have several advantages
- your cam is in front of you and ready to use
- your cam is out of reach from your water supply such as a camel-back

And I'm planning the Tour Mont Blanc ; solo end of this week. , depending on the weather.
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Paul07 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Paul07 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 August 2010 at 10:08
Fully agree with the above.

I am actually just back from the Alps: naked a700 (- so grip staying home -) + CZ16-80 was a wonderful combination. I don't need anything else for hicking.
α7RII-VG 24-70G 70-200G 85/1.8 Samyang 35/2.8 ~~~ α6300 10-18/4 16-70/4 ~~~ Nex-5N 16-50 18-200 ~~~ RX10 IV ~~~ α100 50/1.4 24-105 ~~~ HX60V
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Maurus View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Maurus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 August 2010 at 17:23
I've quite good experiences with a 'two option' setup (used both in Norway and in the Alps):

(1) Allow place inside the main backpack for all your gear, make sure the place is waterproof, as mentioned above. Tricky question here is the weight, carrying too much definitely distracts from enjoying the hike.

(2) Add a small beltpack that takes the camera and one medium sized lens attached to it (I am using Lowepro Off Trail 1; 2 would be larger). When the weather is good you can carry this at the side below the backpack, when weather turns worse or the terrain gets more difficult you can put it in the backpack quickly.

This way, in good weather conditions and during smooth walking, you have the camera handy. I prefer this to a front pack.

Edited by Maurus - 20 August 2010 at 17:29
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Jphank View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Jphank Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 August 2010 at 16:50
I've been using a Lowepro toploader 50 AW and have been happy with it. When I'm hiking/climbing, weight is normally a top priority. This setup allows me to carry my A700 with 16-80 attached (you could probably get away with a larger lens), and has room for a couple batteries or cards. I use the shoulder strap that came with the case attached to the two lower points and wrap it around my midsection, and the two upper point I attach to the shoulder straps of my backpack. It keeps the camera handy and encourages me to take pictures along the way (I don't have to take off my pack to get my camera out). I haven't tried this setup with the Lowepro chest harness, but I might, it's fairly inexpensive and it would allow me to keep the camera on me when I take my large pack off.

A77, CZ 16-80, S 70-300G, Ʃ 8-16, T 28-75 f/2.8, M 70-210 f/4
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flyingscot4 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote flyingscot4 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 August 2010 at 21:45
I have finally settled on a Lowepro Fastpack 250. I have not climbed the fjords, but I have been in the Alps and this was my final choice after using a couple of TLZ's. I carry a regular backpack on my back and my Fastpack on my chest. I don't recommend this for long hauls, but to get from base to train to next base, it's not too bad. The Fastpack has a compartment at the top for an extra sweater and a few chargers and computer stuff and a pocket for a laptop. On day trips, I just carry the Fastpack with about 9 lbs of camera and lenses. Chargers and netbook stay at the hostel, hotel, etc. I can carry that load all day.
a77VG,a550VG,a700VG/Min28 2.8,Min 50-1.7, Min50-2.8M, Min 50-3.5M, Min100-2.8M D, Min135-2.8, CZ16-80, S16-105, Min 28-85, Min 28-135, Min35-70, Min35-105, Tok35-200, all beercans, Min100-300APO D,
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cezarL View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote cezarL Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 June 2007 at 15:15
Originally posted by ChrisH ChrisH wrote:

Originally posted by lauge lauge wrote:

Originally posted by H20boy H20boy wrote:

And yes, the AW Toploader does have a chest strap. check it out.
This looks pretty cool, was wondering if it's possible to have it on at the same time as a backpack without compromising the comfort on you shoulders.
If you want to carry a toploader on our chest the Lowe chestharnass is the thing to buy. I have one myself and in combination with a back-pack it is conveniant. First put on the chestharnass with toploader, than your backpack.


I found a store here in Bucharest that sells the Toploader (all versions- 65, 70 and 75), it seems they have all in stock. I'll try to get there this weekend, and try the bags out, see how they feel. If I manage to do that, I'll let you know my opinions.

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