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Topic Closedbugs and spiders... episode 2

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Direct Link To This Post Topic: bugs and spiders... episode 2
    Posted: 19 November 2007 at 06:48

Just starting a new thread as the previous had got a bit long. But if you still need to comment it is here.

Need someone to start it -- bonus points for doing so!



Edited by brettania - 19 November 2007 at 06:49
 



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Wētāpunga View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 November 2007 at 07:55


Female wolf spider and egg-sac- Lycosa hilaris

Edited by chthoniid - 20 November 2007 at 08:46
a7riii, a9- Voigtländer 15/4.5, 110/2.5 M; Zeiss Loxia- 21/2.8, 35/2, 50/2 & 85/2.4, Zeiss Batis- 85/1.8 & 135/2.8; Sony 24-105/4 G; Sigma 70/2.8 M; Tamron 150-500 f5-6.7; Sony SAL 135/2.8 STF
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dogears View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 November 2007 at 08:17
^great pic to start this thread :)
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dilettante View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 November 2007 at 10:27
Let's have some (shield) bugs to keep the topic title honest:



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jagged View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 November 2007 at 12:14
Nice shots dilettante - I like the almost translucent look in #2.

I find it amazing not only how many varieties of true bugs there are, but also how their appearance changes dramatically as they pass through their various nymph forms. I believe these pictures are all the same type of green shield bug as in your pictures, at different stages of the life cycle:

#1


#2


#3


#4
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 November 2007 at 12:52
I love the colours in #2, jagged. Shield bugs are very co-operative subjects to photograph, and beautiful in their own way :-)

I got a not-very-good shot the other day of the underside of one - I didn't realise they had long probosces tucked away under thier bodies, presumably for sap-sucking.
 



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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 November 2007 at 15:00
The sucking mouthparts are common to all the Hemiptera ('true bugs'). Some are used for sucking sap (e.g. stink bugs, aphids, leafhoppers), some for sucking other insects (e.g. assassin bugs, damsel bugs, pond skaters), and a few for sucking mammalian blood (e.g. bed bugs)

Forest shield bug - (a composite picture as it was too big for the lens I was using at the time!):


Bug-eating bug:


Unknown bug:


Liocoris Tripustulatus:
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 November 2007 at 07:18
Thanks dogears
I like the Hemipterans (bugs) also. Very proper [:LOL:]

This girl is a white-tail spider. Scientific name is Lamprona cylindrata. She's been a immigrant to NZ (from Australia) since the late 19th C.

Recently the species set off a panic in NZ, with people get bitten with great frequency and having their limbs drop off. This puzzled the three people in the country who actually knew the species was not venomous to people. Actually no limbs ever fell off. And in most cases, nobody ever saw the spider that bit them, or more probably insect, or centipede, or sharp stick. But with Doctors suddenly being able to diagnose mysterious reactions to skin breaks (hint: gardening exposes you to micro-organisms) every mysterious reaction was blamed on the white tail.

As you can see I've taken several pictures of this girl. And you may be pleased to know I still have all my limbs






Edited by chthoniid - 20 November 2007 at 07:35
a7riii, a9- Voigtländer 15/4.5, 110/2.5 M; Zeiss Loxia- 21/2.8, 35/2, 50/2 & 85/2.4, Zeiss Batis- 85/1.8 & 135/2.8; Sony 24-105/4 G; Sigma 70/2.8 M; Tamron 150-500 f5-6.7; Sony SAL 135/2.8 STF
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 November 2007 at 07:57
Great shots everyone, keep 'em coming.
In my case, I still haven't spotted any bug|spider lifeforms in the backyard :D that or the weather is still not cooperating :(
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 November 2007 at 10:48
I'm not much good at identifying spiders, but I love these close-up pictures of them - they look so menacing and alien. Imagine being an insect with one of these stalking you...

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 November 2007 at 23:04
That is very nice jagged. How big was the spider originally, and what did you use to take this shot?
a7riii, a9- Voigtländer 15/4.5, 110/2.5 M; Zeiss Loxia- 21/2.8, 35/2, 50/2 & 85/2.4, Zeiss Batis- 85/1.8 & 135/2.8; Sony 24-105/4 G; Sigma 70/2.8 M; Tamron 150-500 f5-6.7; Sony SAL 135/2.8 STF
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2007 at 11:32
Thanks chthoniid. From memory, I think the spider was about 1cm long (excluding legs). I found it under a piece of rusty metal at the edge of a field in late summer. You can see a larger version of the picture here

I can't check the exif at the moment but I'm almost certain I took this before I had bought my Tamron 90/2.8, so I would have used my a100 + kit 18-70mm lens, with a reversed 55mm lens as a macro attachment. I use a foil-lined cardboard tube to redirect the onboard flash.

Edited by jagged - 21 November 2007 at 11:34
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2007 at 16:42
Pardon the IQ :P Just tried out a reversed kit lens at 24mm|f22 with a 5mm (legs tucked in) spider 'living' in our house



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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2007 at 16:44
^Those are full frame btw (sorry can't get to bring out the edit button from my IE version here at home).
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