FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

A Guide to Home B&W Developing

Page  123 4>
Author
bonneville View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 19 May 2007
Country: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Posts: 2275
Post Options Post Options   Quote bonneville Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: A Guide to Home B&W Developing
    Posted: 09 January 2022 at 15:20
Right. 2022 and this morning was a very good morning as I bit the bullet and, having just finished a roll of 36 Ilford HP5plus in the M2 I was determined to give the Lab-Box its first film of mine.

Since I bought it (eBay) virtually unused last year I have read some very mixed reviews and I was in no hurry to be disappointed! But a theme that came through from many of the positive comments was that it is essential to read and follow the instructions and practice with a sacrificial roll first. And they are quite right, as my first few dry runs would have cost me the film. Initially I had assembled the spool back-to-front which means the mechanism is unable to draw the film on to the spool. After addressing that the clip that pulls the film out of the cassette let go of the film and I can now see how important it is to fully squeeze the clip to actually perforate the film.

After I had a few problem free dry runs I loaded the HP5+ without a hitch. Assembled the chemistry set and set to work. There are two options for agitation during the process; continuous and intermittent. Intermittent requires a greater volume of developer so I decided to go for continuous. The Lab-Box comes with a turning knob for turning the reel but my kit came with the optional crank handle, which was just as well as six minute sessions turning the reel with the knob would have been a pain.

Developing with my Paterson tank requires 400ml of developer, stop and fix and my jugs and tubes are all marked up for that, and the routine works well. However the Lab-Box, when using continuous agitation, only requires 300ml which meant a recalculation of chemical to water and remarking of the vessels. It was okay but I intend to get a new set of beakers and jugs so I have dedicated kit for each system.

Once I loaded the developer and started the timer there was no turning back! After the final wash I held my breath and unrolled the film, and it looks fine. It is in the airing cupboard drying and later I shall digitise the negatives, but without close scrutiny all looks well. Even if the images are rubbish that will be down to me and my handling of a fully manual, sans light-meter, Leica.

I see the first few frames are from the Bob and Brian mini-meet at Duxford last year and I took my time completing the film, but the reason for this sage is to give my vote for the Lab-Box which, IMHO, is much better than a dark bag and Patterson tank.
 



Back to Top
Miranda F View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 11 January 2014
Country: United Kingdom
Location: Bristol
Status: Offline
Posts: 4067
Post Options Post Options   Quote Miranda F Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 August 2019 at 13:00
Originally posted by Jozioau Jozioau wrote:


The longevity and stability of silver based film emulsion on either glass or film base is in stark contrast to the relative lack of such security in digital media. There have been many who muse on whether digital files will remain stable or even be readable into the distant future,

Future compatibility may not be as bad as you think. I have some word documents I created originally on a CPM machine in the late 1970s, which got transferred to a BBC model B and then to an IBM, none of which had any compatible media at all. I ended up printing from one and persuading the other that it was listening to a keyboard ...
There will always be ways to convert files, and if you keep multiple copies there's a good chance they will still be readable. Mind you, you do have to keep doing it. I still have a BBC model B and nothing else that will read 5 1/4" floppies (My wife has some 8" floppies...).
Miranda F & Sensorex, Sony A7Rii, A58, Nex-6, Dynax 4, 5, 60, 500si/600si/700si/800si, various Sony & Minolta lenses, several Tamrons, lots of MF primes and *far* too many old film cameras ...
Back to Top
pegelli View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Dyxum Administrator

Joined: 02 June 2007
Country: Belgium
Location: Schilde
Status: Offline
Posts: 35165
Post Options Post Options   Quote pegelli Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 August 2019 at 14:37
Thanks Joe, the first result is up here.

About the lost film, I really can't remember what was on it (except for the 6 shots last week, which were just tests of my camera and to fill the roll). However leaving it in the camera for 6 1/2 years I must believe it wasn't really worthwhile and I didn't lose any masterpieces
You can see the April Foolishness 2022 exhibition here Another great show of the talent we have on Dyxum
Back to Top
Jozioau View Drop Down
Alpha Eyes group
Alpha Eyes group

Joined: 13 May 2007
Country: Australia
Location: Melbourne
Status: Offline
Posts: 8716
Post Options Post Options   Quote Jozioau Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 August 2019 at 13:40
Pieter,
A salutary lesson, but to me, not so surprising.
From the olden days when I was developing my own B&W films and printing from them, I remember having to ensure the mixed developing and fixing chemicals were kept tightly sealed in cool, dark storage cupboards and that after a relatively short time, they tended to darken, at which point I was tipping them down the drain and mixing fresh.
Good to hear that your second exposed but undeveloped film from about 6 years ago was OK when you used fresh chemicals.
The longevity and stability of silver based film emulsion on either glass or film base is in stark contrast to the relative lack of such security in digital media. There have been many who muse on whether digital files will remain stable or even be readable into the distant future, whereas we are able to print fresh off photographic negatives going back to the dawn of photography.
Looking forward too seeing some results from that film posted here when you are able.
"Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst" - Henri Cartier-Bresson
My FlickrPro site
Back to Top
pegelli View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Dyxum Administrator

Joined: 02 June 2007
Country: Belgium
Location: Schilde
Status: Offline
Posts: 35165
Post Options Post Options   Quote pegelli Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 August 2019 at 13:17
Live and learn..........

I still had a roll of film in my camera (from ~6,5 years ago) and it needed ~6 more exposures to finish the roll. Went and took some images in the neighbourhood and got my developing kit out.

I had some older Ilfosol 3 developer left and it had become slightly darker. I remembered the same happened in the past to my concentrate of Rodinal so went ahead anywy.

WRONG !!!!

The film came out totally blank, also no marks of exposure # and film type in the perforated edge and no black patch at the start of the film.

So I guess the developer was totally wasted after standing in a partially filled but tightly closed bottle   



I had another exposed, but not developed, film from around the same time, and developed that in fresh/new Ilford ID11 and it came back perfect and the negatives are being scanned at the moment.

So bottom line, don't skimp on developer cost and try to use old stock, even when it's been stored in tightly closed bottles. It's the same as a failed memory card, but with no software to try and rescue something that might still be on there, the fixer totally removed any latent image that was there before.
You can see the April Foolishness 2022 exhibition here Another great show of the talent we have on Dyxum
Back to Top
carusoswi View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 04 August 2007
Country: United States
Location: Philadelphia
Status: Offline
Posts: 493
Post Options Post Options   Quote carusoswi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 March 2018 at 12:06
I have considered doing my own processing for some time, now. As of late, one of two local camera shops has stopped offering 1-hour service and moved to twice a week pick-up. Further, the last roll of film I had processed was full of spots and (I don't know the cause of these, but they seem to be present in most of my recently processed film) bright spots, white/orange almost florescent spots that I have to "heal" or "clone" depending upon where they occur. I have scanned thousands of negatives exposed in the "back when" days and none of them exhibit the sort of dust, "hair", and bright spots that appear on films I have processed these days. The aforementioned processor was always better than CVS or Walgreen in this respect until this last effort.

I think it is time for me to bite the bullet and start doing my own. I doubt I will do any worse than what I am getting locally.

I want to do color negatives, as this is what I shoot. I've read this thread through and also watched numerous YouTube videos that seem to indicate that I can accomplish home development without huge expense or hassle.

That said, I have browsed this forum, Apug (now photrio (perhaps mention of scanning will meet with less vitriol now)), and numerous other sites.

I must have visited 50 sites until I developed an understanding of how the film spiral onto the development reels (if that's what you call them). So far, my understanding is based only upon what I have observed in videos or read online. I'm certain that all will be more clear when I have equipment in my hands. In some videos, agitation is done only by twisting the "axle" that extends into the development tank. Others practice aggressive agitation of the tank, yet others practice a sort of arcing inversion that seemingly reduces the chance of creating bubbles. Do these details matter?

I know this thread focuses on BW development, but I am determined to do my own color. Videos seem to indicate that temperature, while critical, is not that difficult to maintain, as water tends to hold temperature long enough to get through the development stage if you are only doing a couple of rolls. Also, videos seem to indicate that development chemistry can be reused. One video claimed that the kit they were using was good to as many as 35 rolls of 36 exposure 35mm film. Is this true?

I appreciate this informative thread.
I would welcome any additional advice or reference(s) anyone can provide.

Respectfully,
Caruso
A100/700//900/Sig50mmf2 .8DGMacro/Min 85_1.4/Min 35_1.4/Min 100_f2/Min 100-300/F56AM_F58AM/Viv283/Max9000/Minolta4000/Min24-105/Max9/Min100_2.8 D/Sony50m1.4//Min AF500F8
 



Back to Top
Bob J View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Dyxum Administrator

Joined: 23 December 2005
Country: United Kingdom
Location: London
Status: Offline
Posts: 27126
Post Options Post Options   Quote Bob J Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 March 2018 at 11:19
Back to Top
revdocjim View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group

Joined: 11 September 2006
Country: Japan
Location: Mt. Akagi
Status: Offline
Posts: 8608
Post Options Post Options   Quote revdocjim Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 June 2013 at 12:27
Originally posted by Tezzating Tezzating wrote:


- Dont bother to use a squeegee once removing film from the tank, run the wet film between your fore & middle fingers (the meaty part). Its just as effective and far less likely to scratch if there's impurities.


Why would you touch the developed film with anything? If you have used a proper agent like Kodak Photo-flo or Fuji Driwel at the end of your rinse cycle then just hang the negatives as they are and they will dry without any streaks or spots.
Gallery A7S, A7Rii, Batis 18/2.8, 25/2 Sony 35/2.8, 55/1.8, 90/2.8M, 24-105/4, Minolta 135STF, 200/2.8 Blog
Back to Top
Micholand View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Knowledgebase Contributor

Joined: 30 October 2005
Country: Germany
Location: MUC
Status: Offline
Posts: 17255
Post Options Post Options   Quote Micholand Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 June 2013 at 10:21
B&W Film Developing Times | The Massive Dev Chart - select film and/or developer on the left side.
/Michael

DWEs don't grow on trees! | Posting images&links FAQ
Back to Top
RichardT View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 24 February 2010
Country: United Kingdom
Location: North West
Status: Offline
Posts: 1060
Post Options Post Options   Quote RichardT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2013 at 13:23
I haven't developed a film for many years but offer a couple of tips that still haunt me !
1) Always wind the film completely back into the cassette as this helps identify exposed vs unexposed items & also I was always told that pulling the film back through the light trap increased the chances of some trapped dust scratching the film. As stated in an earlier post a quick twist with a bottle opener (fairly) easily opens the cassette.
2)with the Patterson plastic spools make sure that the spool is completely clean and DRY - I used to have a little electric hairdryer to ensure this - otherwise it's very easy for the film to jam & kink - especially 120 roll film - obviously be careful not to use the dryer if any dust could affect other things you have going on !
Also if you can't get a Dark Room are light-tight developing bags that you can slip your arms into still available ?
Hope these help & Good Luck
RT
So many wines, so little time......
Back to Top
Grubeater View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 02 June 2006
Country: Netherlands
Location: Nijmegen
Status: Offline
Posts: 1129
Post Options Post Options   Quote Grubeater Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2013 at 12:41
There is enough information about developing films on the net, but not so much about exposing and developing your own prints. Any tips?
I do have all the needed chemicals and equipment.
Missing hood or other weird Minolta stuff? PM me. Maybe I can help.
Back to Top
Bob J View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Dyxum Administrator

Joined: 23 December 2005
Country: United Kingdom
Location: London
Status: Offline
Posts: 27126
Post Options Post Options   Quote Bob J Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 April 2013 at 17:51
I thought I should revisit this thread and I've added a bit about some of the (very useful) smartphone apps that are available now: However, I'd really appreciate if anyone would like to make any suggestions to go into the original post.
Back to Top
r_sarvas View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie

Joined: 26 September 2011
Country: United States
Location: CT
Status: Offline
Posts: 120
Post Options Post Options   Quote r_sarvas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 November 2012 at 02:45
Originally posted by Tezzating Tezzating wrote:

...I've read that the washing soda can be replaced by using baking soda heated to a certain level that I dont remember, which is handy cos I couldnt find washing soda anywhere


Funny, that's the part that has kept me from trying it as well. At some point I'll just break down and order some online.
Back to Top
Tezzating View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 21 December 2011
Country: Australia
Location: AB Canada
Status: Offline
Posts: 1509
Post Options Post Options   Quote Tezzating Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 November 2012 at 19:06
Originally posted by r_sarvas r_sarvas wrote:


Has anyone tried the Caffenol developer method? I'm starting to feel wistful about film again and I was wondering if this might be a viable alternative commercial developing. My 7000i could use some exercise.


I've seen the methods and formulas online and it looks interesting, its something I'd like to try one day for sure. I've read that the washing soda can be replaced by using baking soda heated to a certain level that I dont remember, which is handy cos I couldnt find washing soda anywhere
A7M2, Zeiss 24-70/4, Sony G 70-200/4 Like my work? Visit my portfolio!
Back to Top
Dyxum main page >  Forum Home > Equipment forums > Camera Talk > Film cameras Page  123 4>

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.094 seconds.

Monitor calibration strip

Dyxum.com - Home of the alpha system photographer

In memory of Cameron Hill - brettania

Feel free to contact us if needed.