FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

TP: How to photograph the moon

Page  12>
Author
brettania View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Dyxum factotum

Joined: 17 July 2005
Country: New Zealand
Location: Auckland
Status: Offline
Posts: 20650
Post Options Post Options   Quote brettania Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: TP: How to photograph the moon
    Posted: 10 April 2007 at 01:48

There were a lot of posts following the last lunar eclipse, some featuring excellent shots and others that were not great. So in this TALKING POINT let’s take a look at techniques and why some moon shots are good and others are bad.

When I first started using my 7D I started to wonder about taking shots of the moon. I think it is something that everyone does. And like many others before and after me my first attempts were going very badly wrong with a white circular glare in the middle of the frame the only indication of what I was shooting.

So it was time to seek advice. I was posting to DPR at the time and started search for posts to do with the moon. And I consulted a mentor who put it quite simply – “The sunny f16 rule applies”.

What he meant was that for a full moon, one should use of a setting of 1/ISO @ f16, and the reason is simple – the moon is light by sunlight, just as a landscape is on a sunny day. If the moon size shrinks, compensate accordingly by opening up the aperture or slowing the shutter. Forget about AE and use manual – there is no other way to get accurate exposures, and bracket, bracket, bracket (this allows for variations in the atmospherics such as haze and cloud).

The rules for discussion in this thread are simple. Keep to the topic. No repetitive posting, just one contribution per person (which of course you can edit after you have read some of the other posts). The thread will be actively moderated to keep it “clean” and make sure the posts remain on topic. Some posts may be edited if the moderators believe they could be made easier to understand, or are too long.

Let’s hear from you and happy shooting as well as learning.

-
NB one "reference point" is this thread about the last lunar eclipse.

Another reference is Lunar Photography.

Edited by brettania - 17 February 2008 at 23:48
 



Back to Top
DavidB View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 26 March 2007
Location: Canada
Status: Offline
Posts: 2469
Post Options Post Options   Quote DavidB Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 April 2007 at 01:55
Well, brettania, I will post (soon) a shot of the moon that I took on fairly slow film with a 600 f4. The exposure needs to be brief enough that the image doesn't blur from the earth/moon's movement. I haven't, in my opinion, been that succesful at it... it wil be interesting to see what appears.
David
davidbannister.zenfolio.com

a900, a77, RX100 III, 16-50 2.8, 20 2.8, 24 2.8, 28-135, 50 1.7, 100 2.8M, 200 2.8G, 1.4 & 2x TC.
Back to Top
bharnois View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 20 April 2006
Country: United States
Location: USA (RI)
Status: Offline
Posts: 4582
Post Options Post Options   Quote bharnois Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 April 2007 at 18:46
Difficult subject.

Meter so as to produce a somewhat dim image of the moon. In reality many of the features are pretty dark. Trying to make it look like it does to the eye causes is to be too bright. Try to bring out the details in PP. Without a tracking mount you are limited to 1 to 1.5 sec and maybe even less depending on your latitude.

You can try to take a number of exposures within those limits and try to combine them in software. REGISTAX is one program many astronomy buffs use to do that.

I AM NO EXPERT AT THIS (or much else where photography is concerned). You might try CloudyNights.com for real expertise.

Edited by bharnois - 10 April 2007 at 18:47
Just luvin' DYXUM.
Back to Top
Turerkan View Drop Down
Emeritus group
Emeritus group
Moderator emeritus

Joined: 11 February 2006
Location: Turkey
Status: Offline
Posts: 6251
Post Options Post Options   Quote Turerkan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2007 at 16:30
i usually set the aperture to F11 and do a few experiments for the shutter speed, usually end up using some values around 1/200.

IMO the rest depends on the quality of your lens, the focal length and PP.
Back to Top
infrastellar View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 21 July 2006
Country: United Kingdom
Location: Slovakia
Status: Offline
Posts: 1536
Post Options Post Options   Quote infrastellar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2007 at 16:42
Let me join this interesting topic. Was trying to shoot the moon several times. What I know till know, is the fact, that I need to underexposure the picture. I set my preferencies like ISO 100 + aperture close to 10. Playing with the time till the exposure is OK. Everytime goes to minus of the exposition. I have left complete exif here:

minolta 300/2,8 + 2xTC

Infrastellar travel photo

Slovakia, Czech republic, Panama, Peru, Bolivia, Colombia, Venezuela, Philippines, Indonesia, England
Back to Top
momech View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 27 August 2006
Country: United States
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Posts: 2883
Post Options Post Options   Quote momech Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2007 at 16:53
Use spot metereing; meter off a bright area; adjust EV. Adjust aperture for sharpness as necesary; last few times I did this was with Minolta 400/4.5 which is sharp wide open so left it at 4.5. This keeps shutter speed fast so I don't worry about it.
 



Back to Top
gonzalez52 View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie

Joined: 15 June 2006
Location: Greece
Status: Offline
Posts: 88
Post Options Post Options   Quote gonzalez52 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2007 at 17:14
When I used to own a (cheap) tele lens I followed the Sunny-16 rule for moon photos which I found to be pretty accurate. F16 & ISO = 1/Shutter (ex. f16 - s 1/100 - iso100). KM 5D in manual mode and adjusting shutter speed to get best results

Edited by gonzalez52 - 11 April 2007 at 17:16
Chris
-----
Former owner of KM D5D
Back to Top
Sanjuro View Drop Down
Emeritus group
Emeritus group
Administrator emeritus

Joined: 19 September 2005
Country: United Kingdom
Location: Sweden
Status: Offline
Posts: 5849
Post Options Post Options   Quote Sanjuro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 April 2007 at 09:16
Originally posted by gonzalez52 gonzalez52 wrote:

When I used to own a (cheap) tele lens I followed the Sunny-16 rule for moon photos which I found to be pretty accurate. F16 & ISO = 1/Shutter (ex. f16 - s 1/100 - iso100). KM 5D in manual mode and adjusting shutter speed to get best results


So it is a sunny rule for the moon?
I need one TC ot Tele, my max range is 210mm and I guess I will never get a nice moon with only the beercan :-(
Rgds
Sanjuro

"I paint objects as I think them, not as I see them." --Pablo Picasso
Back to Top
gonzalez52 View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie

Joined: 15 June 2006
Location: Greece
Status: Offline
Posts: 88
Post Options Post Options   Quote gonzalez52 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 April 2007 at 09:33
Originally posted by Sanjuro Sanjuro wrote:

Originally posted by gonzalez52 gonzalez52 wrote:

When I used to own a (cheap) tele lens I followed the Sunny-16 rule for moon photos which I found to be pretty accurate. F16 & ISO = 1/Shutter (ex. f16 - s 1/100 - iso100). KM 5D in manual mode and adjusting shutter speed to get best results


So it is a sunny rule for the moon?
I need one TC ot Tele, my max range is 210mm and I guess I will never get a nice moon with only the beercan :-(


:D I know what you mean! I am waiting on my newly bought beercan, and I am trying to convince myself not to spend any more cash on photography items this month to buy a couple of TCs just to take photos of the moon! :)

As for the Sunny-16 rule, remember that the moon is a sunlight object. I've read a couple of books and a number of articles over the internet that suggest using this guideline in order to capture the moon. Of course you might need adjustments depending on whether it is full or not etc but it's a good place to start.
Chris
-----
Former owner of KM D5D
Back to Top
revdocjim View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group

Joined: 11 September 2006
Country: Japan
Location: Mt. Akagi
Status: Offline
Posts: 8608
Post Options Post Options   Quote revdocjim Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 April 2007 at 13:33
This thread from another forum begins with an astounding shot of the moon and some helpful technical stuff follows if you read through the whole thread. I don't know if using a telescope disqualifies it from this thread or not but anyway... I was impressed!

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1037&message=22614502
Gallery A7S, A7Rii, Batis 18/2.8, 25/2 Sony 35/2.8, 55/1.8, 90/2.8M, 24-105/4, Minolta 135STF, 200/2.8 Blog
Back to Top
jimbo View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 16 May 2006
Country: United Kingdom
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Posts: 906
Post Options Post Options   Quote jimbo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 April 2007 at 13:54
I use the Minolta 500mm AF Reflex to photograph the moon.

I find the Moon fills the spot metering circle, so I spot meter on it which normally gives a good exposure, though I bracket at faster shutter speeds. (Around 1/800 - 1/1000 @ISO 100)

During the lunar eclipse being stuck at f8 was a pain - you don't really want to expose the moon longer than 1s - it moves so fast so I had to increase ISO to 400, a normal lens with adjustable aperture would be better to increase shutter speeds and thus sharpness.

On focusing, the AF RF can be tricky to focus in the best of conditions so I use AF - the Moon is a bright object against a dark background so provides an excellent contrast boundary for the AF to lock onto. I use the centre point and aim it at the edge of the Moon then switch back to manual.

Back to Top
polossatik View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 16 August 2006
Country: Belgium
Location: Brussels
Status: Offline
Posts: 1013
Post Options Post Options   Quote polossatik Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 May 2007 at 01:53
This is a nice overview: linky
The "Looney 16 Rule" :)
7D / A580 and assorted lenses from 8mm fish to 1000mm / Minolta 7s Rangefinder /

HP Photosmart Pro B9180 In Da House!!
Back to Top
polossatik View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member

Joined: 16 August 2006
Country: Belgium
Location: Brussels
Status: Offline
Posts: 1013
Post Options Post Options   Quote polossatik Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 May 2007 at 01:54
Originally posted by jimbo jimbo wrote:


On focusing, the AF RF can be tricky to focus in the best of conditions so I use AF - the Moon is a bright object against a dark background so provides an excellent contrast boundary for the AF to lock onto. I use the centre point and aim it at the edge of the Moon then switch back to manual.


AF? i think you can consider the moon to be at infinity....
If this is not far enough then i think you need your lens checked for back focus :)

Edited by polossatik - 02 May 2007 at 01:55
7D / A580 and assorted lenses from 8mm fish to 1000mm / Minolta 7s Rangefinder /

HP Photosmart Pro B9180 In Da House!!
Back to Top
Turerkan View Drop Down
Emeritus group
Emeritus group
Moderator emeritus

Joined: 11 February 2006
Location: Turkey
Status: Offline
Posts: 6251
Post Options Post Options   Quote Turerkan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 May 2007 at 16:51
Originally posted by polossatik polossatik wrote:


AF? i think you can consider the moon to be at infinity....

especially when shooting at F8 :)
Back to Top
Dyxum main page >  Forum Home > Dyxum Community > Knowledge Base Page  12>

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.

Monitor calibration strip

Dyxum.com - Home of the alpha system photographer

In memory of Cameron Hill - brettania

Feel free to contact us if needed.