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TP: How to photograph weddings?

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ricardovaste View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ricardovaste Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 March 2011 at 14:12
Originally posted by Its Atomic Its Atomic wrote:

Originally posted by ricardovaste ricardovaste wrote:

I took part in that, but it wasn't great for non Canon/Nikon shooters.


It's only a problem imo if you are insecure about your camera system choice.


Woh, back up there - No need to go splashing such statements around. Many of the options in the survey were only relevent to Canon/Nikon system options - they were too specific "IMO", with no equivelents for the a-mount system. This does not make me insecure about 'my camera system choice', it's simply a statement about the contents of the survey.

Good day.
 



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ricardovaste View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ricardovaste Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 March 2011 at 14:16
Originally posted by Its Atomic Its Atomic wrote:

Anyone here use umbrellas at a wedding? Mind sharing how?


There are many different styles to wedding photography, so it's not a simple matter of do or don't. A couple of examples:

(1) It's quite popular these days to treat a wedding like a fashion shoot, so having lighting equipment is easy to work around as it's staged environment with time put aside for.
(2) Group photographs - more traditional but most usually want them and they're again staged, pre-arranged, easy to have the time for a lighting set up which might include umbrellas and other options.

Wondering around with two umbrellas strapped to each shoulder would certainly be a special site

edit: typo

Edited by ricardovaste - 19 March 2011 at 14:17
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Its Atomic View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Its Atomic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2011 at 01:14
Originally posted by ricardovaste ricardovaste wrote:

Originally posted by Its Atomic Its Atomic wrote:

Anyone here use umbrellas at a wedding? Mind sharing how?


There are many different styles to wedding photography, so it's not a simple matter of do or don't. A couple of examples:

(1) It's quite popular these days to treat a wedding like a fashion shoot, so having lighting equipment is easy to work around as it's staged environment with time put aside for.
(2) Group photographs - more traditional but most usually want them and they're again staged, pre-arranged, easy to have the time for a lighting set up which might include umbrellas and other options.

Wondering around with two umbrellas strapped to each shoulder would certainly be a special site



That's interesting re: group shots, as my reading to date implies most people are in a rush to get to the food / drink / celebration / party of the reception, and from my experience, the married couple typically go and have their married shots so the pressure is on to get to the location, etc.

When you say group - how big is the group? In my mind I see 50 people on the steps of the church and wonder how an umbrella would help there. For the formal family group shots I can see that would help control the lighting - but again all my wedding experience they were shot outside. Do wind and terrain have much impact on setting the umbrella(s) up and having them stay in place. I guess that's where an assistant would really pay dividends.

I've never used an umbrella for photography, however, and am looking at B&H to get a couple soon and start playing with lighting.

I meant no offence with my insecure statement. Your statement (it was no good for non-CaNikon) could have been interpreted as "the results were poor" or "the survey was constructed poorly" - and I took the former meaning.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote keithf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2011 at 21:01
Wanna know how to shoot a wedding then check out Jonathan Ryans site

http://peoplebyryan.com/weddings/wedding-news

Although I have never met him (not through choice I hasten to add just haven't had the chance yet) I have "comunicated" with him online through www.cameracraniums.com and he is without doubt one of the nicest guys on there...as for weddings his advice is normally "leave it to the pro's but if you must do it here's some tips...."

But check out his website read the blogs etc you may just get some tips that you won't get anywhere else...
"Everything in moderation including moderation"
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Octupi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2011 at 22:10
To many posts here to reply with them in mind.

1. Work with the couple that hires you to find out what they want and if it fits your style. (I've turned down weddings where they wanted me to work/process in a way I just don't do)

2. Make a plan for the day and review it with the couple, best man and bridesmaid - this puts them on the same page as you and they know what to expect.

3. Be ready for your plan to go out the window as it usually does.

4. Be a second shooter for another photog for a while to learn the ropes.

5. Work with the couple that hires you...

6. Have a solid contract that protects you like an armored car.

:)
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ricardovaste Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 November 2013 at 11:53
1) Strongly suggest they hire a real professional if they care about the results.

2) Thoroughly set expectations. Bring them down to the ground. This means every single step of the process, not just pieces you want to highlight.

3) If you haven't already been able to, flee the country.

4) If you are presented with shooting a wedding for the first time, my suggestion would be:

a) Use the equipment you are most familiar with. Sure, bring extra pieces for backup that you can leave somewhere else. But this isn't the time to learn new things.

b) Do not buy new equipment. And if you do, make sure they're paying for it. Otherwise you're just "gifting" them $$$, which would be better put towards someone who knows what they're doing.

c) Use minimal kit. 1-2 lenses. It would be beneficial to have 2 bodies, but if you don't, that's just another part of the risk. Most will not know when to change lenses or settings etc so rather than fiddling with stuff just use something ordinary and focus on making images.

d) Have an agreement in writing, even if they're friends, even if they're family.

e) Plan thoroughly.

f) Go with your instincts.
I photograph the moments in people's lives that mean the most to them: Richard Harris Photography
 



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Post Options Post Options   Quote Miranda F Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 December 2015 at 14:31
I've found that non-flash pics using available light, even in a badly or unevely lit church, can be very effective with a modern DSLR/DSLT and some PP, even taking jpegs. The latest Sony jpeg engine is fantastic if you leave DRO on to give it some help BUT the AWB doesn't get it right all the time, so take some effort to balance this in each location.

It also allows you to take non-intrusive pics (especially if you're not the main photographer). As a non-professional sitting in the pews, I've also been able to get nice pics of the ring swap which the pro missed (and, for whatever reason, didn't fake later). A quiet shutter is useful here . . .

Outdoors a long lens is good to take candid un-posed group photos.

On posed shots, always ask the pro if he's happy for you to take pics too - some aren't if they see you with a decent DSLR and fear you'll lose them income!

Agree that co-ordinating phone pics on facebook works well. In pre-mobile phone days, a good friend bought or borrowed a dozen cheap automatic cameras and handed them to guests - he saved on a pro photographer and got lots of good pics (I presume he didn't like posed groups either . . .)
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